Grandfather stands up for his gay grandson.

I came across a story today that left me a little perplexed on how to feel.  The story starts with a familiar tragedy: a son tells his mother he’s gay and the mother boots him out of the house.  The twist comes when the boy’s grandfather penned a letter to the mother disowning her for her cruelty.  Here’s that letter:

"He was born this way and didn't choose it more than he being left-handed. You, however, have made a choice of being hurtful, narrow-minded and backward. So while we are in the business of disowning children, I think I'll take this moment to say goodbye to you. I now have a fabulous (as the gay put it) grandson to raise..."

Anti-gay prejudice, as confirmed by polling, is much stronger in older people.  So I’m happy to see this exception to trend.

But I’m sad to see hate, as infused by a supposed religion of love, tearing families apart.  This is what faith has given us.  So I celebrate the grandfather not being consumed by the same love-destroying influences as his daughter.  Even so, I still lament the whole situation.  This is what I will think about every time a Christian implies or asserts that Christianity has the monopoly on family values.  Absolutely wrong.  This is what Christianity can do to families and somehow still manage to call it “love”.

The anti-gay tantrum parade: Peter LaBarbera round 2.
The anti-gay tantrum parade: Bobby Jindal.
The anti-gay tantrum parade: Peter Labarbera.
Guest post by Danielle Muscato: I'm gay, but I'm not celebrating today.
About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


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