GOP can’t believe someone might lie about the Affordable Care Act.

The Republican party, which told every lie imaginable in their quest to defeat the Affordable Care Act, have seized upon their strategy for the upcoming election cycle: Obama, they say, told a single lie about the Act.

In his West Virginia district, the TV ads attacking Democratic Rep. Nick Rahall over the calamitous startup of President Barack Obama’s health care law have already begun.

The 19-term veteran, a perennial target in a GOP-shifting state, is among many in the president’s party who have recited to constituents Obama’s assurance that they could keep insurance coverage they liked under the 2010 overhaul.

That has proved untrue for several million Americans, igniting a public uproar that has forced Obama to reverse himself on part of the law and sent many Democrats scrambling into political self-preservation mode ahead of next year’s congressional elections.

Ok, so the President said that when the ACA passed, people would be able to keep their present coverage.  I think it’s pretty likely that what he meant was that if you have a present level of insurance coverage that you won’t lose it or be forced to pay more.  He likely did not anticipate people, for whatever reason (probably an excuse to defy Obama), deciding they didn’t want to pay less for the same amount of coverage or better.  And now the GOP is leaping on this to say he lied about the ACA (a crime for which one would think the GOP would be incredibly tolerant).

The irony is that several GOP voters will overlook the fact that anybody can get insanely cheaper insurance now, as well as all the lies the GOP told them over the past few years about the ACA, to act as though a bit of poor communication is the worst thing Obama could have done.

What’s more, this marks another instance of the GOP latching onto an unpopular idea to try and win national elections.  It was their ardent opposition to gay marriage and abortion that greatly contributed to them getting trounced in the last election.  This will continue to be the case until the GOP changes gears on those issues (this creates another problem, since the GOP sold its soul to the Tea Party, and many Tea Party leaders have said a change on marriage equality would move them to split away from the GOP, hence splitting the Republican vote).  And now they’re making their stand on the ACA, which even Forbes admits is opposed by a scant minority.

Society is progressing as it always has: toward greater concern for individual liberty and greater care toward one another (not just the “greater care” that means allowing people to abide by your religion and to hell with equal rights otherwise).  If you don’t get on that train, yeah, you might win some local elections in states that are ranked last in pretty much every category where you want to be ranked first (education, median income, teen pregnancy, etc.), but you’re done on the national level.

About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


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