Nonreligious Voters Are Far Less Likely To Become Republicans As They Get Older

Nonreligious Voters Are Far Less Likely To Become Republicans As They Get Older May 4, 2020

Overall, older voters are more likely to vote Republican. This has been a trend for awhile now and often affirms a common trope that liberals are younger and conservatives are older. Shifting demographics with nonreligious people may change this however.

Research by Dr. Ryan Burge shows that nonreligious people are less likely to become Republican as they get older. As you can see in the graph below, there is a huge gap between Christians and nonreligious Republicans are they age.

Dr. Burge summarizes these findings (emphasis mine):

“However, the nones seem to defy the conventional wisdom about age and partisanship. There does seem to be a move toward the GOP between youth and middle age. For instance, just 14.9% of those 35 and under identify as Republicans, but that goes up to 23.3% for those between 45 and 54. But then, something noteworthy happens – the trend just stops. In fact, there is no statistically significant difference between the share of nones who identify as Republicans among 45-54 year olds and those who are 75 and older. The gap for Christians is sixteen points, but for the nones it’s just four points and inside the margin of error.”  

This has some really interesting implications for the future as nonreligious people are a quickly growing group in the United States. If you care about liberal values, these are some encouraging signs amidst some difficult times.


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