Made to Matter: Book Review

Made to Matter: Book Review January 4, 2009

No one likes to waste time. We have planners on our desks, calanders in prominent places and clocks in every room to keep us on track.

Even worse than missed time, are missed opportunities.

Randy Kilgore is on a mission to help Christians make the most of their unique opportunity in the marketplace. “Did we miss the chance,”he asks in his poignant new release, “Made to Matter: Devotions for working Chrisitans.”


The book is a collection of 53 weekly lessons to help us make a difference in the workplace. Kilgore’s approach goes far beyond hanging a fish on the back of your computer monitor or putting a “Not Perfect, Just Forgiven” bumper sticker on the work truck. He espouses the whole Christian, the same Red Letter Believer concept we preach, of allowing the teachings of Christ to infuse the entire person.

He gives practical advice for living out your faith – from excellence in your duties to honesty in your dealings to sensitivity to coworkers.

Kilgore has an international workplace ministry, primarily driven by his weekly newsletter, “Made to Matter.” If you are one of his 50,000 subscribers, you’ll be familiar with Kilgore’s style. Find a real-life story from history or modern times, and apply timeless God-truths to the story. Someone else took the same approach 2,000 years ago, using parables to connect men and women to another Kingdom.

I didn’t follow the one-message-a-week layout in the book. I covered all 53 chapters in just a few days and you might just do the same. The writing is engaging. The message is powerful. And the applications are timeless.

Over the next three days we’ll interview Randy and he’ll help us all begin to matter in this world around us. Next week, we’ll pose specific questions from you for Randy on “how can I make a difference.” If we use your question, you’ll get a complimentary copy of “Made to Matter.” Email your question here.
Please, share with a friend if you feel moved.
Read all past issues at http://www.patheos.com/blogs/davidrupert

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