Crazy Rhetoric at CPAC

Crazy Rhetoric at CPAC February 13, 2012

The Conservative Political Action Conference took place in Washington, DC had its usual amounts of crazy rhetoric and Right Wing Watch is recording it all and highlighting some of the worst examples. Like this one, from a guy named Jeffrey Bell. Did you know that liberalism is one big plot to destroy the family that was hatched during the French Revolution? I didn’t either.

httpv://youtu.be/HUzCpygVZHc

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  • Akira MacKenzie

    Considering how wonderful the instition of the family has been over the centuries, I only wish that it’s destruction was liberalism’s goal.

    Feh! Children should raised by the government so mom and dad can get on with their lives without screaming, income-and-liberty-sucking, brats under foot. Meanwhile the kids don’t have to deal with their neurotic, abusive, anddysfunctional parents screwing up their potential.

    Everybody wins

  • brucecoppola

    Sacre bleu! Les conservatifs Americaines, zey are on to us! Ze jig, she is up!

    (abject apologies to actual French speakers)

  • ambassadorfromverdammt

    @ #2

    Merde!

  • helenaconstantine

    But the American revolution also destroyed the monarchy, the established church, and the nobility. Doesn’t he realize the logical consequence of his rhetoric is the re-subjugation of the America to the British crown?

  • raven

    The French Revolution? Huh, what?

    Even in terms of fundie demonology, this is lame.

    What happened to the commies, Jews, Moslems, atheists, satan, demons, nonwhites, women, children, Unitarians, scientists, space reptiles, and UFO aliens?

    If you add up the hates and fears of these people it is just about the entire human species.

    It would be much easier to just say what they like. Which seems to be old, rich white guys with personality problems and brains the size of walnuts.

  • aaronsavadge

    So in conclusion the founding fathers were also liberals.

  • pacal

    It has been a common meme that “Liberals” etc, are plotting to destroy the “Family”.

    Edmund Burke in some of his more over the top denunciations of the French Revolution accussed the French Revolutionaries of deliberately planning to destroy “Love” and the “Family”. Part of this scheme was to introduce suitible tutors / teachers into Aristocratic famlies for the purpse of seducing daughters and wives thus creating “blended” individuals and of course destroying “Love” and the “Family”.

    Burke’s foaming at the mouth hysteria is obviously pure agit-prop and a cooly deliberate lie. Since Burke this lie has become a staple of “Reactionary” propoaganda.

  • brucecoppola

    @#4: Thing is, we can make America great again…if only we get rid of all that pesky Enlightenment stuff in the foundation.

    [/innerWingnut]

  • ..and that boys and girls is how we, as a country, got freedom fries and why the rest of the world will only sell us safety scissors and paper circles. No sharp points for us!

  • d cwilson

    Santorum was making noises about the French Revolution recently, too. I wonder who on Planet Wingnuttia decides which hobgoblin is the hobby horse of the week.

  • cottonnero

    d cwilson: That is one deliciously mixed metaphor.

    Now I’m imagining a hobgoblin riding a hobby horse in Michele Bachmann’s basement, spouting gibberish. “Socialist muslim Ayers radical commie chemtrail fascist Alinsky liberal Denzel Washington crudité Gay Agenda!”

    We know this is fantasy, because if this hobgoblin existed, it would currently be a Fox News contributor.

    “I’m Paul Hobgoblin. Steve Doocy is out sick today. Obama Kenya european liberal Michael Fassbender Goldline fluoride Cuba Pelosi!”

  • Mr Ed

    There was a Simpsons episode where the parents discover an elixir that improves romance. All of the children are kicked out of their houses to give the adults some privacy. The children based on there limited understanding of the adult world formulate a bizarre theory for the change in the adults behavior. Other than romance this is a fairly good metaphor for CPAC.

  • D. C. Sessions

    If you add up the hates and fears of these people it is just about the entire human species.

    And that’s how high-RWA people happen, children. Make them afraid and never, ever feed them after midnightlet them get to know people different from them, and you’ll have lifelong little storm troopers who will always answer the dog whistles.

  • John Horstman

    @5: I’ve been seeing intended-to-be-disparaging conflations with the French Revolution coming from Conservatives a lot recently (as with charges of “Communist”, “Socialist”, “Liberal”, and “atheist”, I always though the French Revolution was a decidedly good thing – liberté, égalité, fraternité is pretty much the principles on which we modeled our little experiment in representative government, with some glaring blind spots like women and brown people and the poor, of course). The whole anti-French thing seems pretty tightly wound up with anti-intellectualism. I don’t know what other factors are contributing. Deciphering encoded Conservative memes is a full time job, at least.

  • John Horstman

    @11: Glenn Beck?

  • Mr Ed @ 12: There was a Simpsons episode where the parents discover an elixir that improves romance. All of the children are kicked out of their houses to give the adults some privacy. The children based on there limited understanding of the adult world formulate a bizarre theory for the change in the adults behavior. Other than romance this is a fairly good metaphor for CPAC.

    I knew it was the reverse vampires! Those guys hate the free market, what with its insistence that people should work the overnight shift and have to pay for their really expensive UV light beds…

  • Chiroptera

    John Horstman, #14:

    Huh. Growing up in the US, the French Revolution was always presented to me as a negative thing. As an example of good intentions gone awry, the evils of extreme excess, the harbinger of Bolshevism, Mao Zedong, Pol Pot, and Shay’s Rebellion.

    I always figured that was common in Anglophone countries. Am I wrong?

  • Chiroptera “I always figured that was common in Anglophone countries. Am I wrong?”

    It’s been a while since I was in school, here in the Great White North, but I remember The French Revolution as good, but The Terror being bad. Demonarchying/people’s uprising against injustice, good, everybody even vaguely connected with their power structure losing their heads after, bad.

    If memory serves, it was brought up with the American revolution (“Essay Question #7: Compare and contrast the American and French Revolutions, including the actions preceding, during and after…”).

  • d cwilson

    My understanding of the French Revolution itself was a positive thing, but the aftermath, especially the “reign of terror” was where things went awry. Someone like Robespierre, who started out with high ideals, eventually endorsed the violence he used to disparage. And of course, when the whole thing devolved into chaos and corruption, it set the stage for the rise of Napoleon.

  • wobert

    Didn’t Chou En Li tell Henry Kissinger that it was to early to tell what the results and implications of the French Revolution were?Damn communist,fascist,muslim,atheist,socialist nascar hating furriner.

  • You all should read Corey Robin’s book The Reactionary Mind. In it he lays out the historical objectives of conservatism which he believes is a reaction to movements on the left – the first being the French Revolution. The left tries to expand rights and the right sees this as an affront to the natural order. They honesty believe that a world of hierarchy (especially in intimate areas of the home and workplace) is a better world.

    I have no expertise in this area, but it sounds like this guy is onto something. I guess the right and the left began in the French Revolution.

    http://coreyrobin.com/

  • exdrone

    raven @5 writes:

    The French Revolution? … What happened to the commies, Jews, Moslems, atheists, satan, demons, nonwhites, women, children, Unitarians, scientists, space reptiles, and UFO aliens?

    It’s like believers in alt-med. The belief systems are mutually exclusive and contradictory, but the believers support each other against a common target rather than criticize each other. Delusion loves company.

  • drizzt

    #2 Maintenant qu’est ce on va inventer pour avoir les americains de notre coté ?

    Pretty bad french sorry, haven’t written french in ages…

  • michaelstone-richard

    … since the time the left was invented in the 1790s…

    The left (read liberalism) was invented in the 1790s?!

    1) Since there have been politics, there have been liberals and conservatives. They may not have had those labels, but that’s what they were.

    2) You can’t have a left without a right and vice versa. Was the right also invented in the 1790s? It wasn’t only the term left that began to be used in the 1790s, the term right began to be used at the same exact time.

    Imagine what would happen if Newt were to be elected (installed):

    Subject: Newt! the children have no bread!

    King Newt: Let them work as a school janitor so they can buy bread.

  • M Groesbeck

    @ 24 —

    Well, by most standards today’s Left (that is, in every context but the freakishly right-wing United States, the spectrum from social democrats at the center-left through socialists, communists, and anarchists) really only started to emerge at the end of the 18th/beginning of the 19th century. Before that, “liberal” (a model of capitalism based on a supernaturalist view of property and unshakeable faith in the basic goodness of the market gods which was quite progressive at the time and lives on in center-right parties such as the Democrats here in the U.S.) was about as far “left” as one could get. (In the context of the French Revolution, where we get our “right/left” terminology from, politics was a great bloody mess, but the outlines are still there. The idea that human needs, rather than profit, should be the primary concern of politics was, and remains, a distinguishing feature of the Left.)

  • dingojack

    cottonnero (#11) – Because YOU ASKED FOR IT! 🙂

    The American Revolution would have failed if not for French troops and the French navy. When they got home they soon found the country broke and starving thanks to a spate of foolish military adventurism in far off lands…

    (hmmm why is that last sentence sounding so awfully familiar?)

    Dingo

  • longstreet63

    Hm. So the Jacobins wer all about the destruction of existing institutions, eh?

    Poor innocent institutions that never did them any harm?

    I suspect the reason the French Revolution is being re-demonized is that some bright boy on the Right noticed that conditions in the USA are rapidly coming to resemble pre-revolutionary France.

    Income and legal disparity, a useless oligarchy, national debt being used to punish the common people. And let’s not forget the practice of unlimited detention by executive order. Although in that case, the executive was anybody with money and a patent of nobility.

    I say, bring out the red caps.

    Cuz I don;t look good in sans-culottes.

  • cottonnero

    Dingojack #26: Good Lord. Be careful what you ask for…