I Want to Meet Roy Moore’s Gay Friends

I Want to Meet Roy Moore’s Gay Friends February 15, 2015

Like pretty much every bigot since the beginning of time, Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore swears he has lots of friends from the object of his bigotry (gay people, of course). He says he has lots of gay friends and I bet he even lets them use his bathroom:

“I’ve had many friends who are homosexual,” Moore said during an interview with John Heilemann and Mark Halperin of Bloomberg Politics. “I’ve treated people just like other people. This is not about how I treat people, or how I go to a wedding or a marriage or anything. It’s about the constitution of Alabama and the Constitution of the United States.”

“You wouldn’t be reluctant, personally, to go to a same-sex wedding, then?” Halperin prodded.

“I would not go to a same-sex wedding,” Moore responded. “No.”

So let’s take a look at what Moore thinks about his “many” gay friends, from a 2001 ruling he handed down in a custody case involving a lesbian parent where the fact that she was a lesbian was not an issue in the case at all (it was about allegations that the father had abused the children). But Moore said that the mother should be stripped of her custody because she was a lesbian, an argument the father hadn’t even made.

To disfavor practicing homosexuals in custody matters is not invidious discrimination, nor is it legislating personal morality. On the contrary, disfavoring practicing homosexuals in custody matters promotes the general welfare of the people of our State in accordance with our law, which is the duty of its public servants. Providing for the common good involves maintaining a public morality through both our criminal and civil codes, based upon the principles that right conscience demands, without encroaching on the jurisdiction of other institutions and the declared rights of individuals.

The State may not interfere with the internal governing, structure, and maintenance of the family, but the protection of the family is a responsibility of the State. Custody disputes involve decision-making by the State, within the limits of its sphere of authority, in a way that preserves the fundamental family structure. The State carries the power of the sword, that is, the power to prohibit conduct with physical penalties, such as confinement and even execution. It must use that power to prevent the subversion of children toward this lifestyle, to not encourage a criminal lifestyle.

So he has LOTS of gay friends, he just thinks they should either be imprisoned or put to death so they don’t pervert the children. Because that’s clearly the basis of a solid friendship, isn’t it?

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