Rick Perry’s New Aide Thinks Women Shouldn’t Hold Public Office

Rick Perry’s New Aide Thinks Women Shouldn’t Hold Public Office March 23, 2015

Rick Perry has hired a new top adviser to help him win over Christian conservatives in Iowa and elsewhere. Jamie Johnson ran Rick Santorum’s Iowa operation in 2012 and is a member of the Iowa Republican Central Committee. He also thinks that women should not hold public office.

Rick Perry’s latest hire as a top campaign staffer was embroiled in controversy in 2012 over a private email which suggested children’s lives would be harmed if the nation had a female president, according to the Des Moines Register.

Jamie Johnson is a longtime Iowa Republican activist who was hired by former Texas governor and likely 2016 presidential candidate Rick Perry on Wednesday to organize conservatives in Iowa and other early primary states. Johnson is a member of the party’s state central committee and was a staffer for Rick Santorum’s caucus-winning campaign in 2012.

The controversial email, which Johnson sent to a friend in the summer of 2011 and which was then leaked to the Des Moines Register a few months later, included the question, the paper reported: “Is it God’s highest desire, that is, his biblically expressed will … to have a woman rule the institutions of the family, the church, and the state?”

That email went on to say that if a woman were elected president, children would be harmed. Johnson has offered pretty much the lamest possible excuse for it:

He said the email was “sent to one person, speaking as a pastor, to someone who is a personal friend of mine”. Johnson emphasized this was a “private message” and not intended to be shared publicly.

He contrasted this with the tweets posted by Liz Mair, a former digital strategist for Wisconsin governor and presidential hopeful Scott Walker, prior to her brief employment with the campaign that criticized ethanol subsidies and Iowa’s outsized role in the presidential nominating process. Johnson said those tweets, which quickly prompted Mair’s resignation, were intended to be public and she knew that. In contrast, he argued that his remarks came in private correspondence in his role as a pastor and was about “theological nuances”.

Yeah, it’s totally unfair to hold him accountable for his own idiotic and sexist remarks because he didn’t know you were going to see them! Just like if you catch someone trying to hire a hitman to kill his wife, you can’t arrest him for that because he said it in private, not in public. Dumbest. Excuse. Ever.


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