Maine School Objects to Telling the Truth

Maine School Objects to Telling the Truth April 3, 2015

Hemant has the story of a public high school in Maine where student leaders were introducing the daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance by telling students that they should recite the pledge if they want. The school put a stop to that and now a “compromise” has been reached.

For more than a month now, there’s been controversy at South Portland High School in Maine over how they announce the Pledge of Allegiance. Three student body leaders, while reading the morning announcements, were reminding their classmates that they didn’t have to participate by asking students to recite the Pledge “if you’d like to.”

At the time, the principal put a stop to it because, he said, it was going against protocol, but the students (with the principal’s support) went to the school board to request a revision to the policy.

So here’s the revision:

Caron said senior class President Lily SanGiovanni would likely adopt the new pledge procedure Thursday morning, when she would say over the intercom, “I now invite you to rise and join me for the Pledge of Allegiance.”

Let me ask the obvious question: Why is the school so opposed to telling the truth? Students do have the constitutionally protected right to not stand for or recite the pledge of allegiance. That was decided more than 70 years ago. So why is it a bad thing to inform them of that? Because you think more kids might exercise that right? Is that seriously what the principal of a public high school ought to be doing?


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