Creationist Represents Himself in a Silly Lawsuit

Creationist Represents Himself in a Silly Lawsuit May 28, 2015

A creationist from West Virginia has filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the teaching of evolution in public schools violates the “established clauses” (he probably means the Establishment Clause) because evolution is a religion. I probably don’t need to bother mentioning that he’s representing himself, though he’s not a lawyer.

A parent of a Jefferson County student has filed a federal lawsuit against local, state and federal education officials claiming the teaching of evolution, which he says is a religion, violates his child’s Constitutional rights.

Kenneth Smith, who is representing himself, filed the four-page federal lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia against the Jefferson County Board of Education, state Superintendent Michael Martirano, National Institute of Health director Francis Collins, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and the U.S. Department of Education…

Smith alleged education officials violated the U.S. Constitution because he claimed they are “propagating” a religious faith in public schools.

“Their actions during the 2014-2015 school year affects my child’s future directly through the state grading system to enter college and the ability to earn economic security and a good job in her chosen veterinarian medical field of work, by being taught a faith base (evolutionary ideology) that just doesn’t exist and has no math to back it,” Smith’s lawsuit said.

Smith said officials “refused to cease” their violations.

Imagine that. The NCSE reports that he’s the author of a creationist book on human origins. And there’s this:

In his complaint, Smith contends that the defendants “wrongfully violated established clauses” — presumably a reference to the Establishment Clause — in continuing to allow evolution to be taught “[w]hile denying the Plaintiff’s accurate scientific mathematical system of genetic variations that proves evolution is a religion.”

Shall we start a pool on how long it will take the judge to dismiss this case? I’ll take 4.8 seconds after he reads it.


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