My Daughter Got A Bible For Her Birthday, What Should I Do?

My Daughter Got A Bible For Her Birthday, What Should I Do? July 16, 2019

When my son was born, my Danish sister-in-law gave him a book of Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales. We have cherished it for eleven years, now. When he was smaller, we would read from it together at bedtime. Nowadays, he’s consuming more challenging books on his own — the Giver, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Land of Stories, etc. But his book of fairy tales from his Aunty Tine sits on his shelf, still loved. Maybe one day he’ll pass it on to his kids as I gave him my book of Peter Rabbit stories I received when I was a baby.

It is doubtful, however, that he will ever believe the tales in either of these books to be true.

That’s because I’ve raised him with a solid understanding of what is real and what is not. I’ve taught him to be able to question claims that seem more outlandish, especially, but also to never fear questioning anything at all. I even urge him to examine the things I say. So, I never worry when he’s faced with a brand new book full of implausible tales. He’s far too skeptical a person to end up believing in talking snakes and humans living in the belly of a whale.

Recently, someone asked me this,

My very religious grandmother has expressed her intent on giving my daughter a children’s Bible and the Book of Mormon at her birthday party later in the month. We are not religious, and she knows that. I can’t help but feel she’s planned this so that my daughter will have to open it in front of everyone else. I don’t want her to give these books to my daughter, and if she must, I’d prefer she hand them to me so I can just donate them to the library or something before my kid sees them and asks questions. What should I do?

Just like the Adventures of Peter Rabbit or a book of Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, the Bible and the Book of Mormon are collections of moral tales and nothing more. There are no magical indoctrination powers embedded in the pages as you turn them. The mere act of owning them, or even thumbing their pages, is not going to turn your daughter into a believer.

The stories in the Bible and the Book of Mormon are just as wild and unbelievable as a talking rabbit dressed in a little blue jacket. For a child to accept these crazy tales as the truth, indoctrination needs to occur, and that is a hefty, time-consuming task.

Your daughter would first need to be told, over and over again, that these stories are true. That’s not enough, though, as many parents do this with Santa, the Tooth Fairy and the Easter Bunny and kids still manage to sort out that these things are not real. They figure it out when doubts creep in, and they inevitably ask questions. This is the second part of the indoctrination. If your child is to believe the Bible and the Book of Mormon, she will also have to be discouraged from asking questions that are going to come up as she consumes these stories. The third (and some would suggest the most crucial) part of indoctrination is setting an example. Children mimic their parents. When they have devout parents who make a spectacle of prayer, often they will do the same.

On the flip side, when a child is raised in a home where no age-appropriate books are off-limits, where questions are encouraged and rewarded with meaningful answers and where her parents never pray or attend church, it is doubtful that she will end up believing the stories in the Bible.

My suggestion is to graciously accept the gifts. Then, behave as though there is nothing different or exceptional about these books over any others. Treat them exactly the same as you would a Harry Potter book or The Land of Stories series. If you treat these books as different or off-limits, your child might wonder why. It will be a source of mystery and curiosity, and you’d be inadvertently giving them power. If these books have no special place in your household, either positive or negative, they will have no influence over her.

You can also make a point of sitting down with her to read the stories from the Bible as you would any other fairy tale. Have an open dialogue about what is possible and what is not. Don’t be shy about telling her that you don’t believe any of it and ask her if she thinks the things you’re reading are possible. You can even explain that some people believe these things to be real, but that advancements in scientific knowledge are proving some of the stories in the Bible to be impossible.

The point is, talk to her about it. Expose her to these ideas on your terms because she will be exposed someday whether you want her to be or not. I always feel it’s far better to control their first experiences with beliefs like Christianity. If you try to avoid the topic and hide it from her, she’s going to come across someone, someday who will expose her to it and that person is going to be the one in control of the message. Don’t wait for that to happen. Instead, take charge now and use it to exercise critical thought and skepticism.

How would you deal with this situation? Let me know in the comments!

Buy Me A Coffee
I’m writing a book addressing the many reasons believers distrust atheists. I’m around 40,000 words in! If you want to help me get it done, you can support me by donating here or becoming a patron here.

Image: Creative Commons/Pixabay

"And a hat tip to flammable/inflammable while we're here."

Are These 7 Arguments For A ..."
"God apparently has no problem revealing himself to some people, so don't give me the ..."

Are These 7 Arguments For A ..."
"I have found it to be true, that if you don’t first choose to trust ..."

Are These 7 Arguments For A ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    This will create friction with the giver of the books. You will have to be careful when the little one visits the giver. I see a high probability that the giver will attempt to undermine the “household” authority to instill God’s. Better to have that conversation with the giver sooner rather than later. It doesn’t help that society sets grandparents up to be spoilers to parents.

  • Jack the Sandwichmaker

    More than likely the kid will be bored out of her mind if she tries to read the book. There are some interesting stories in there, some of which are important to be familiar with to understand American culture, but other than the Creation you won’t find them just flipping through the book.

  • Freodin

    That’s why there are special children versions of the Bible. I don’t know if there are those for the Book of Mormon. The real adult versions of those books… yeah, not what I would give a child to read. Especially the Mormon Book.

  • Cozmo the Magician

    are collections of IMMORALmoral tales
    fify

  • Freodin

    I have encountered this problem with my little protégé, a girl of eight years. Her family is not religious in any way, and she’s brought up to be curious and open. But religion plays a big part in our culture and schools, and she herself has asked to attend the religious classes. Religious education is mandatory here in Germany, even though their are secular alternatives. I don’t know how these are done, especially for children of elementary school age… but I can imagine that the religious stories are more interesting.

    So we were sitting together, doing school stuff, and she noticed my own old Children’s Bible. She told some stories from school, asked some questions and I started to explain the differences between the “real” Bible, the Children’s Bible… and my own atheist approach on all these stories. At some point, she insisted that the stories told in the Bible were true, because her teacher told her that.

    It all comes down to trust at that age. A childlike faith. She will have to learn that not everything an adult tells her is true and correct. She’s still young, and she doesn’t see the dilemma in trusting two adults who tell her different things. I just tried to reassure her, to make up her own mind, to learn, to study, to test.

    She will be leaving the country for the next three years… her family is relocating for occupational reasons. It will be interesting to see how her view on this topic will be when she returns.

    She will be leaving in two weeks. I’ll be missing her horribly.

  • Wow
  • Freodin

    Well, I should have guessed it. 🙂

  • Robert Baden

    I grew up with stories of the Greek Gods.

    The movie Jason and the Argonauts came out when I was eight.
    Much more interesting.

  • Polytropos

    This post is great advice from start to finish. A kid raised without indoctrination, in a household that encourages critical thought, is very unlikely to become a believer, and they do say reading the Bible is the best way to become an atheist. Reading the Bible as a kid was certainly an important milestone on my road to atheism. Also, Bible stories are just not that exciting compared to most of the media and entertainment available to kids in 2019. Most likely the girl will find the books a bit disappointing and quickly move on to more interesting things.

  • WallofSleep

    Excellent response. I’m sure the children’s bible will be heavily redacted of all the heinous, inhumane (and inhuman) things it endorses that would make any decent person, child or not, recoil in revulsion. Depending on the age of the child, I would further recommend getting a regular version of the bible to read alongside it so she can see all the horrible things the children’s bible is trying to hide from her.

  • WallofSleep

    “Also, Bible stories are just not that exciting compared to most of the media and entertainment available to kids in 2019.”

    Heck, the same was true when I was a kid in the early 70’s, and that was the decade of :guh: disco.

  • Bob

    ..if you haven’t before , read it

  • WallofSleep

    The bible? I can guarantee you the overwhelming majority of Western atheists already have.

  • sweeks

    Mark Twain had this to say about the Book of Mormon:
    “All men have heard of the Mormon Bible, but few except the ‘elect’ have seen it, or, at least, taken the trouble to read it. I brought away a copy from Salt Lake. The book is a curiosity to me, it is such a pretentious affair, and yet so ‘slow’, so sleepy; such an insipid mess of inspiration. It is chloroform in print. If Joseph Smith composed this book, the act was a miracle–keeping awake while he did it was, at any rate.”

  • Raging Bee

    Which parts, specifically?

  • Astreja

    Been there, done that — in 1963. That’s why I don’t believe — I managed to get through the entire book without some adult telling me it was true.

  • guerillasurgeon

    My son got the Tao of Pooh. We would have killed for a Bible. The pages are so thin it’s great emergency toilet paper.

  • Jim Jones

    > the Bible and the Book of Mormon are collections of moral tales

    Barely. There’s very little that is morally uplifting there, and the prose is turgid.

    Try a library for R Crumb’s Genesis. See what you think. Or look for The Brick Testament.

  • Jim Jones

    It’s unreadable.

  • Jim Jones

    Grandmother Fish is well reviewed.

  • Bob

    read it all

  • Bob

    what a struggle that must have been !

  • Bob

    all of it … start with the Gospel of John

  • Bob

    lol … why ?

  • Chris Hogue

    don’t buy bull

  • Astreja

    For someone who learned to read at age 2½, not insuperable (I was bored with ‘See Jane run. Run, run, run’ in school and looking for new reading material, and raided my parents’ bookshelves on a regular basis). I’ve never been able to see the Bible as anything more than fables from a long-dead culture that bore little resemblance to my reality in suburban Montreal in the 1960s.

    The only part of the book that ever resonated with me was Matthew 25:35-40, which I try to actively practise, and which fits well with my humanism.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    This situation is one in which the child should be *encouraged* to repeatedly ask the giver “Why?” every time an assertion is made about religion.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    What makes you think we *haven’t* read it all?

    For quite a large percentage of our group, that’s WHY we became atheists.

    (In my case, it was the obvious nonsense that quickly turned me off…so I never bothered with it…any more than I would with any other poorly done and incredible writing. Cutting losses by not wasting time on garbage books is a good thing.)

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Another early reader here. In my case, my parents and older brother had me reading (and cursive, too) by kindergarten. Some fun stories in that, that I wish I could remember, rather than being told of them later by my parents ;-).

    I wonder if early reading is correlated with unbelief?

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Subjectively, it’s self-contradictory, violent, abusive, and damaging.

  • Astreja

    Well, early reading plus access to a variety of materials makes it easier for kids to learn of different points of view and to form their own opinions. The reading itself wouldn’t be much help if all you have in the house is a shelf full of Left Behind novels (ack!)

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Good point on the texts available to the new reader.

  • Jim Jones

    Try it.

  • Bob

    did you come to that opinion on your own ?

  • Robert Baden

    I’ve still got nine volumes of Collier’s Junior Classics. Looking in the Myths and Legends one, they’ve got Greek/Roman, Norse, Indian, North American Indian. Beowulf must have been in a different volume. There is a volumn called Hero Stories.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    I have a Bible. I occasionally find it useful while working crossword puzzles.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    I read the Tao of Pooh. Attended a book club meeting to discuss it. The meeting was disappointing. No one else seemed to recognise ToP as thinly-veiled anti-intellectualism. Maybe they thought it was an actual Winnie the Pooh book, I don’t know. I made my statement, someone gave me the “out of context” dodge, so I opened up to a marked page and read a paragraph or so. “Is that enough?” I asked, “I’ve got lots more.”

  • WallofSleep

    They already have, Bob. They already have.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    I haven’t read it all. My tradition was Catholicism, where that sort of thing isn’t valued much. The stuff I did read was questionable enough.

    But I will point out that the burden of proof is highly asymmetrical. If I claim that the Bible contains scientific errors, historical errors, moral errors and contradictions, all I have to do is point out a few of each. If someone else wants to claim that the Bible is inerrant, they need to defend every verse of every chapter.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    Like the story of Jesus and the woman taken in adultery (John 7:53 – 8:11) which is widely acknowledged by scholars to have been added centuries later?

  • ThaneOfDrones

    Some parts are dry as toast. The begats in Genesis for example, the lists of who ruled when are equally dull (parts of Judges, Kings, and Chronicles)

  • ThaneOfDrones

    No, the Holy Spirit guided me to it.
    /s

  • Lisa Cybergirl

    My dear great aunt had read the King James version all her life. My parents gave her a modern-English translation. She read that and was absolutely HORRIFIED at all the violence, and never picked up a bible again.

  • Bob

    lol ..ok

  • Bob

    I understand and agree ..for me , because the Bible is not entirely written in chronological order , the geneologys and lists of rulers add to my perspective .

  • Bob

    ..well it is a phenomenal story .. and even though it (and maybe a couple of others) weren’t in the oldest manuscripts we have available , it might have been in the original writings .

  • Bob

    Why ? Was it in order to convince them of it’s authenticity ..or to validate disbelief ?

  • Bob

    Oh , I have and I do .. it is awesome !

  • Bob

    right ! “How much better is it to get wisdom than gold ! And to get understanding is better than to be chosen above silver !”

  • Astreja

    Amazing how effectively words like “ye” and “thou” and “shalt” can obfuscate meaning when they’re no longer part of colloquial language. Maybe it kicks the brain into some unusual state where you hear and remember something, but can’t quite grasp its meaning.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    “Everything sounds better in Latin”

    😉

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    What’s the exchange rate between wisdom and gold? Or that between understanding and silver?

    And who do you know who will accept wisdom or understanding as payment, and how soon will they be starving to death?

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Yep, that I did.

    You seem *awfully* eager to accuse us of being easily led du mb herd animals … have you ever heard the phrase “every accusation is a confession”? Because that’s what I’m seeing.

  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    As a standing rule, I encourage everyone to question everyone. You, me, everyone. And yes, much conflict can be avoided by having a discussion with the child while the Christian is present.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    Dream on.

    Also, let us know when any of the original writings are found.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    Someone put me onto this today:

    The Christ: A Critical Review and Analysis of the Evidences of his Existence

    by John Eleazer Remsburg (1909)


    The internal evidence against the authenticity of the Fourth Gospel is conclusive. The Apostle John did not write it. John, the apostle, was a Jew; the author of the Fourth Gospel was not a Jew. John was born at Bethsaida; the author of the Fourth Gospel did not know where Bethsaida was located. John was an uneducated fisherman; the author of this Gospel was an accomplished scholar. Some of the most important events in the life of Jesus, the Synoptics declare, were witnessed by John; the author of this knows nothing of these events. The Apostle John witnessed the crucifixion; the author of this Gospel did not. The Apostles, including John, believed Jesus to be a man; the author of the Fourth Gospel believed him to be a god.

    Regarding the authorship of the Fourth Gospel, Dr. Davidson says: “The Johannine authorship has receded before the tide of modern criticism, and though this tide is arbitrary at times, it is here irresistible” (Canon of the Bible, p. 127).

    (Revelation) is a book which, Dr. South said, “either found a man mad or left him so.”

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    And I might be chosen as the team gi golo for the Swedish Olympic Bikini Team … and neither is more nor less likely than the other.

  • Great response. I think I might also advise your correspondent to also give her daughter a book, at the same party, preferably a lovely hardbound copy of D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths. (That’s one my kids grew up with, and it really helped with putting religion in perspective.) Or some other big book of mythology. And at home shelve the bible and book of mormon with the other books of myths and fairy tales.

  • WallofSleep

    Because the overwhelming majority of Western atheists were once xtians of some denomination.

  • Robert Anthony

    That sounds like very good, solid advice. I was taught that everything in the bible was true from a very young age. I made a point of burning mine about 10 years ago. : p

  • ralphmeyer

    Why bother with a false religion created by that falsehood pushing convicted con man and charlatan, Joe Smith?

  • We were reading it the way we had our entire lives — as a way to know more of how the god would have us to live. But then we made a mistake… we studied it a little too long We read a passage over again instead of just saying “that’s odd” and moving on.

    It was Bible study that made us atheists, Bob. We were believing Christians, and quite serious about it. Lukewarm Christians never find a reason to disbelieve, but real Christianity is a sure path to atheism!

  • ralphmeyer

    Same here…The thing’s often vile, foul, definitely xenophobic, anti-multicultural, and morally the pits.

  • Duncan R. Bryson

    It would be interesting to know the girl’s age unless I missed it – I scanned the mother’s question again. I’m assuming she’s a bit older than five (the average age children start primary school in the UK) as I’m taking it that she has started to read.
    I’ve never been married nor lived with anyone so don’t have children. At 67 it’s unlikely to happen now. I therefore can’t claim any experience in raising children but I think I would be able teach young people to be critical, questioning and analytical.

  • ThaneOfDrones

    We would have killed for a Bible.

    I thought there was a commandment against that.

    Ba-dam sis!

  • Sharon Dee

    I agree completely with what you say here, especially the parts about the forbidden having more power than the mundane. You treat the book like, “here’s some more fun reading for you” and turn them loose. The other parts of the indoctrination are missing–depending upon how much time the theist gift giver spends in the recipient’s life–so the little tyke can grow up and make up his/her own mind.

  • Bob

    lol .. you’ll see what your CREATOR has to say regarding your disbelief..but , thanks for the humor .. atheists , who fancy themselves as experts on everything including the Bible , are like the American Idol contestants who come on the first few nights imagining that THEY ARE the next IDOL …they THINK they can sing but are really very foolish ..you can’t sing bro , or be the gigalo ..

  • Bob

    Ok , real Christianity has a problem because what WE want CAN over-rule what GOD wants ..this was the situation from the beginning … Adam and Eve had that choice ..”do I do what God wants ..or what I want” ..thank God for the possibility of forgiveness ..”real Christianity” does NOT lead to becoming what your CREATOR says is a fool … someone , or something led you there .. here’s an insight ..it wasn’t GOD

  • Bob

    lol .. personally , I liked the Jetsons

  • Karen the rock whisperer

    These are just other books, true…but the Book of Mormon is a hard slog, or so I gather from snippets I’ve seen, and the Bible is iffy, even rendered into something for children. I think the important thing is for a parent to engage with the child on these books, because they *are* believed by many, and you can bet the ranch that Grandma is going to use the books as springboards for discussion. If the child is old enough, she can be armed and dangerous:

    Grandma: isn’t that a pretty rainbow? Did you read the story about Noah, where God sent a rainbow as promise that he would never flood the earth again?
    Grandkid: but Grandma, science shows that the flood never happened. Besides, rainbows happen a lot when the sun and the rain clouds match up just right.

    A few of these conversations, and Grandma might give up.

  • Bob

    Absolutely , the book of mormon is garbage

  • Bob

    You see what you want to see

  • Jean Oltvedt

    How would you explain Grandma’s belief in those stories?

  • C_Alan_Nault

    Give your daughter a book of Greek mythology & let her know that if she wants to read about gods,the Greek mythology book has a lot of different gods and goddesses in it.

  • sweeks

    I bought Crumb’s graphic novel version of Genesis a couple years ago. Takes me right back to the ’60s. The Brick Testament is on my wish list!

  • sweeks

    Have you seen Steve Wells’s “Skeptic’s Annotated Book of Mormon”? One of the categories is “Plagiarism”. 🙂
    http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/BOM/index.htm

  • Philip Buczko

    Considering some of the stories in the bible would you give a child an 18 rated DVD? You would have to sift through the book and tear out dubious pages that might upset the child, in fact redaction, like an FBI file on the Kennedy murders could be an option. I think social services would need to be involved, the motives behind the giving of this gift should be investigated.

  • Bob

    No , but I am familiar with The B of M

  • buffettphan

    Remember when we had to cover our textbooks in school? Maybe make a cover that says “The Big Book of Jewish Fairy Tales” and as others have said, shelf it with mythologies, fairy tales, and works of fiction. Seriously though, I love your response — it’s spot on.

  • Frank Valente

    BURN IT! OR USE FOR TOILET PAPER!

  • Chris Davis

    My kids got Bibles as well as Aesop’s Fables and Grimm’s Fairy Tales. Same difference.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Yeah….it shows.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Absolutely , the book of mormon‘bible’ and all other ‘holy’ books are garbage

    FTFY

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Why bother with a religion for which there’s no reputable evidence?

    Like xtianity, for instance?

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Well, Taoism in general is anti-intellectual…so there you go.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Hopefully the burn was for good use, like starting up a charcoal fire for some cooking?

    😉

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    real Christianity has a problem because what WE want CAN over-rule what GOD wants

    That tends to be the case when a real person has wants and the putative ‘god’ has no reputable evidence for its existence.

    Adam and Eve had that choice

    WRONG! ‘Adam’ & ‘Eve’ had no knowledge of right and wrong, remember? (According to your ‘bible’, anyway…) That’s *exactly* what the fruit of the tree was to ‘grant’.

    You sound like the kind who’d let a baby play with fire, acid, and razor blades, then blame the baby when something bad happened.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    As I quoted, “Every accusation a confession”…and you just did it again.

    Now I’m wondering if it’s on purpose or just your subconscious bleeding through.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Yeah, you keep saying that nonsense.

    Why not just provide *EVIDENCE*? It would be SO much easier for you, since this supposed ‘god’ of your is so powerful and important, such evidence should be everywhere, specific, and irrefutable.

    And before you go the ‘proof denies faith’ direction, realize that your supposed ‘Satan’, per the story, KNOWS that your supposed ‘god’ exists and still rebels, so knowledge wouldn’t force compliance with the supposed ‘god(s)’ will.

  • HairyEyedWordBombThrower

    Childhood indoctrination by society at large at that time.

    Why do you ask?

  • Bob

    lol you , and Satan’s other minions , constantly fighting against the GOD you say doesn’t exist is one proof .. otherwise , the creation is proof of the CREATOR .

  • Bob

    your quote is illogical and not based on the factual evidence

  • Bob

    no , Adam and Eve had not experienced disobedience to GOD ..they already KNEW it was wrong to do so BEFORE they partook of the fruit ..you might actually try READING the book you try to critique

  • Bob

    Absolutely for you , Hairy , the Bible is worthless since you haven’t read it nor do you have any ability to understand ..you have permission from your CREATOR to continue your religion of disbelief .. you’ll see how that works for ya …

  • Robert Anthony

    Nope. Sometimes it’s enough to just watch something burn. It went in a campfire under a clear night of a zillion-bajillion stars. : )

  • Scooby Doo for me!

  • Fair enough.

  • That’s all you can do. Just encourage critical thought. Well done!

  • ThaneOfDrones

    lol .. you’ll see what your CREATOR has to say regarding your disbelief

    rofl – Why would you believe that you have a CREATOR (and not just a caps-lock dysfunction) and that His words are in the Bible? Given that the Bible is filled with scientific errors, historical errors, moral errors and contradictions?

  • Jean Oltvedt

    It’s not that simple if it’s a child 10 or under but nice try. Why did you respond as if you had no experience with children?

  • Bob

    Hairy ! You are so funny !

  • Bob

    lol Hairy .. you’ve just defined the religion of atheisim

  • Bob

    wow , you will believe anything but the truth .

  • The Percy Jackson series (movies) continues this style of (Greek Gods) entertainment today, while tv’s Supernatural gives a good re-take on Christian lunacy. That’s not neglecting Amazon Prime’s edition of Good Omens which packs in chills with a humorous POV!

    https://youtu.be/KBz0es8nQHU

    https://youtu.be/SGVhesWfPMY

  • The list of who begat who else, and the next, and the next . . . can be an alternative to counting sheep. That’s my take on using a bible to encourage elusive sleep.
    (But you have to avoid trying to pronounce the weird names – just take their closest everyday analog! i.e. The idea is to create a state of boredom, and not putting your brain to work.)

  • ralphmeyer

    Plagiarism is not only rife in the Book of Mormon, but the Quran of the dipstick Muslims as well.

  • ralphmeyer

    And exactly where do you find the truth? Not in the Bible, certainly, nor the Koran. You want truth, go for science based on cogent evidence and proper reasoning.

  • ralphmeyer

    You coulda taken one free from any church that bangs the things on Sundays et al.

  • ralphmeyer

    Good use of one!!

  • ralphmeyer

    Somebody, I can’t remember who, said that reading the Bible was the best way to make an atheist. I can believe that!

  • ralphmeyer

    Besides, according to the Bible, god was the one who created them the way they were, so they really weren’t the guilty ones, the dipstick god was!!!

  • ralphmeyer

    Simple. Poor old Grandma has never really read the vile falsehood filled thing.

  • Bob

    cogent evidence ? Like the creation is proof of the CREATOR ? .. or would you rather be satisfied with theory …

  • Jean Oltvedt

    So you know nothing.

  • sweeks

    Atheism is a religion in the same way not collecting stamps is a hobby. 🙂
    Oh… you were talking about “atheisim”. My bad!

  • Bob

    thanks for correcting my paper , mrs. sweeks . .. can you do this one also ? lol

  • ThaneOfDrones

    We don’t fight against GOD (or any gods for that matter) we fight against bone-headed people who insist that God exists and who want to impose His will (which always always always corresponds exactly to their own will) on other people.

    the creation is proof of the CREATOR .

    A very well-rounded argument. Circular, in fact.

  • Sophotroph

    Yeah, the kid’s too young for rolling papers.

  • Sophotroph

    Why do you speak as if you have no experience with adults?

  • Sophotroph

    Like the creation

    You mean the Great Was-Here-When-We-Got-Here?

  • Sophotroph

    The thing you just said, the magic spell you cast using words you don’t understand, has some components missing. That’s why it doesn’t work.

    If you want to speak of logic and evidence to us, you have to demonstrate that you know what they mean.

    Yelling “illogical!”, “no factual evidence!”, as if you’re trying to scare vampires away with garlic just shows us you don’t have enough of a command of the words you use to be taken even a little seriously.

    tl;dr We can all see you acting like a child. Showing us your “Offishul Gwron-Up Badge” and stamping your feet has the opposite of the desired effect.

  • rationalobservations?

    The good thing about modern versions of bible is that all the contradictions, historical inaccuracies and scientific absurdity is there for anyone to find.
    Many of us have found rational atheism after discovering the garbage within the pages of a modern bible.
    Translation from Greek into English is still work in progress – but the oldest 4th century fabricated bible (Codex Sinaiticus) is now available online and a scholatr who had been studying the prototype and comparing it to the King James Version counted over 14,000 discrepancies between them.

    A good guide to the ridiculous and barbaric, internally contradictory content of bibles can be found here:
    http://bibviz.com/

    Any ridiculous old book of myths, legends, fables and lies is no threat to any child unless they are brainwashed and indoctrinated to imagina that the garbage has some element of truth.

    https://pics.me.me/many-of-the-books-of-the-new-testament-were-written-47677571.png
    https://pics.me.me/the-truth-about-faith-having-faith-that-something-is-true-11341532.png

  • Robert Baden

    And Xtians stole the Jewish Scriptures and called them their own