Two Archaeologists, A Russian and A Monk Walk Into a Blog …

Two Archaeologists, A Russian and A Monk Walk Into a Blog … January 6, 2019

A few days ago, I stumbled onto a quirky, niche Facebook site titled “Archaeology/History Jokes & Puns (Or GTFO!).” Who knew musty bone-hunters were so hilarious?

This charming cartoon below was what first caught my eye. It’s so nerdy it’s hip.

 

Get it? Archaeologists mainly study the past — including ancient peoples and civilizations — and to determine when their subjects lived in the past, they need to “date” them with scientific processes and tools, such as radiocarbon dating. To determine the age of organic materials found at dig sites, archaeologiests analyze the predictable decay speed of a particular radioactive carbon isotope (carbon-14) found in them. So, you see why the cartoon is funny now, right?

And speaking of dating, there was this bit (below) on that site that in my view is even sillier and funnier. It’s tag line is: “When you start dating someone new, and they have a Russian banner on their wall, that’s a big red flag.”

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And finally, there’s this cartoon that’s all about religious nonsense but also about nothing of the sort.

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It reminds me of the story my very-left-handed dad told me about when he was a kid and his teacher strapped his left arm behind him to force him to use his right hand when he was learning to write. Didn’t work. Dad died a left-hander and fallen Catholic — with still-lovely penmanship, now a lost art in the computer age that even archaeologists with radiocarbon dating won’t be able to reincarnate.

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Image from “3,001 Arabian Days” — Son of an Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) employee learns to ride a camel in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, 1955. (Photo courtesy Saudi Aramco)

Available on Amazon!

FYI, my new memoir — 3,001 Arabian Days — is now available in paperback and ebook formats on Amazon, here. It’s the story of growing up in an American oil camp in the Saudi Arabian desert from 1953-1962.

Reader review:

“Author Snedeker’s wit and insights illuminate the book’s easy narrative. His journalistic style faithfully recreates the people, places and events, and keeps the story crisp and moving from one chapter to the next. More than a coming of age story, 3,001 Arabian Days is a moving tribute to the intricacies of family, a celebration of Saudi Arabian culture, and a glimpse into a time gone by, but whose shadowy specter you can still almost reach out and touch.” — Mark Kennedy


 


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