April 8, 2015

I’ve had two essays published recently that don’t have anything to do with the culture wars but are still relevant to my philosophy of the New Chimera. The first one is called “The Beast of Birdin'” and the second one is called “Taking Pleasure in the Sounds of Words.” You can check them out at The Toast here. (Image via john shortland at Flickr) Read more

April 5, 2015

My latest article is up at The Daily Beast, in which Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Nietzsche (for all his faults) are my patron saints of religious naturalism. (Image via Thomas R. Stegelmann @ flickr) Read more

April 5, 2015

My latest article is up at Salon.com—”The Scientology Paradox of Neil deGrasse Tyson.”  I genuinely like Tyson; but the horse of public discourse needs its gadflies, too. (Image via Wikipedia Commons) Read more

March 29, 2015

My fellow Patheos blogger Peter Mosley has a post up purporting to show evidence that firebrand atheism works. He writes: People may be vocal about rude, negative arguments, but the fact is that, like it or not, they can be quite effective in several situations. Mosley’s primary source of evidence for this claim comes from the results of studies on political campaign ads. Throughout his post, Mosley concedes that drawing a clear conclusion from this comparison is complicated—but I think… Read more

March 25, 2015

I want to respond to fellow Patheos blogger Peter Mosley’s critique of my Salon article where I argue that it’s best for atheists to ally themselves with progressive religious believers in the pursuit of the common goal of social justice in a pluralistic society. The first thing I should mention is that writers generally don’t get to pick the titles of their articles. Editors have their own agendas, and in addition to expressing them through the choice of articles they… Read more

March 22, 2015

My latest article at Salon is up. It’s my argument for why atheists should reach out to and join forces with progressive believers for the common cause of social justice in a pluralistic society. I believe that doing so will serve as a catalyst for even more change. We should see a softening of the positions of the “militants” on both sides, precisely because human beings are more receptive to messages from those with whom we share a tribal badge…. Read more

March 14, 2015

As an atheist who criticizes religion and promotes a complete separation between church and state,  I nevertheless have many friends and family in my life who are believers and whom I love dearly, so I’ve tried to walk the fine line of respectful criticism—which has been difficult, because as my friends and family know, I’m snarky by nature. I’m an equal opportunity snark, though—I readily share snarky Facebook memes of Brian Williams as much as of Bill O’Reilly. Though I… Read more

February 14, 2015

Happy Valentine’s Day! My latest article at The Daily Beast is up, “Can Atheists Have Soulmates If They Don’t Believe In Souls?”, and it’s this atheist’s take on love. Read more

February 13, 2015

One thing is clear: the narrative created by the Angry White Male in American culture needs to go. It’s enjoyed a privileged status in our national consciousness for far too long. Whether it’s the FoxNews Christian White Male or the Militant Atheist Male, it’s a narrative that breeds misogyny, xenophobia, homophobia, and bigotry and intolerance in general. Another thing is clear, too: the narrative that replaces it should be based on the sturdiest foundation possible. The case of Eric Hicks… Read more

February 10, 2015

In his 2005 book Things Merely Are: Philosophy in the Poetry of Wallace Stevens, philosopher Simon Critchley exhorts us to read more poetry because he believes doing so can help us overcome one of the central problems of philosophy: bridging the chasm between “thought and things or mind and world.” In other words, what philosophers call epistemology. But I think the bigger challenge is trying to achieve a meaningful life in the face of a meaningless and indifferent universe. I… Read more


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