Quoting Quiverfull: Socialization Isn’t Important?

Quoting Quiverfull: Socialization Isn’t Important? May 17, 2014
Even chickens need socialization

by Matt Walsh at The Matt Walsh Blog – Behold: the two absolutely worst arguments against homeschooling

I’ll only say that you chose a pretty strange analogy to prove your point. You can’t teach a child to swim without bringing him to a pool? I agree. But do you bring a child to the pool, drop him there with a thousand other kids, then come back 6 hours later, and repeat that process every day, five days a week, for the next 12 to 13 years? Or do you bring him to the pool, hang out with him, maybe even get in the water and play some Marco Polo, and then leave with him after a couple of hours?

I can tell you this: if you decide to just abandon your kid at the pool for hours and hours and hours on end, every day, for over a decade, he probably won’t do a lot of swimming. If he doesn’t drown (drowning is a very real possibility, especially if there’s only one lifeguard for every 40 kids), he’ll likely spend more time playing on his iPhone and smoking pot in the bathroom than learning the backstroke.

Indeed, when it comes to teaching your kid any other skill — whether its swimming, or driving, or riding a bike, or catching a baseball — all parents understand that their hands-on involvement is crucial. It’s only with the skill of ‘socializing’ where many of us suddenly decide that the matter should be outsourced to a factory in China (or a factory down the street, in this case).

Why do I even need to debunk the socialization claim? You’ve seen our society, haven’t you? You’ve interacted with people, right? Homeschooling might be increasingly popular, but the vast majority of the people you meet have been public schooled. And you’re telling me that the vast majority of the people you meet are ‘socially well adjusted’?

Read the entire article at The Matt Walsh Blog (where he’s going to beg you not to use pop up blockers on his site so he can make some quick click-view cash.)

Comments open below

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement by Kathryn Joyce

13:24 – A Story of Faith and Obsession by M Dolon Hickmon

QUOTING QUIVERFULL is a regular feature of NLQ – we present the actual words of noted Quiverfull leaders and ask our readers: What do you think? Agree? Disagree? This is the place to state your opinion. Please, let’s keep it respectful – but at the same time, we encourage readers to examine the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

"We're seeing a lot of cases and possible exposures because someone that has it went ..."

When Quiverfull Beliefs Run Public Policy: ..."
"I just happened to buy a large box of basic masks about 2 1/2 years ..."

When Quiverfull Beliefs Run Public Policy: ..."
"My hair was kept short until I was 9, when I agreed to take care ..."

When Quiverfull Beliefs Run Public Policy: ..."
"There's a company that makes specialty products for dreads, including wax-based product for twisting the ..."

When Quiverfull Beliefs Run Public Policy: ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • SAO

    By comparing socialization to teaching a kid to ride a bike, swim, drive, or catch a baseball, Walsh is proving how wrong he is. Socialization is learning how to deal with people who are different than you and people your own age. Expecting kids to learn this without extended exposure to other people is like teaching someone to swim without getting in water, to ride a bike without actually getting on a bike, to drive without getting behind the wheel or to catch a baseball without the ball. The kid might master the theory and ace the written test, but could he actually catch the ball. ride the bike, not drown, or not crash the car? I wouldn’t bet on it.

  • tulips

    To drive home your point… one of our children played Wii bowling before actually bowling. This child was a Wii bowling master. So imagine the surprise when this same child threw the bowling ball across two lanes the first time she ever tried bowling for reals. Yeah. Actual experience does matter.

  • That_Susan

    I posted in the wrong place.

  • Nea

    when it comes to teaching your kid any other skill — whether its
    swimming, or driving, or riding a bike, or catching a baseball — all
    parents understand that their hands-on involvement is crucial

    Oh? My parents understood that it was right and good that I was interested in learning things that they could not teach me because they didn’t have the equipment and/or the aptitude (or, to be blunt, the interest). That would be why I rode horses for decades although my parents are mildly afraid of them, and am the only person who knits, sews, or does art in the family.

    If you limit a child’s education to *only* what the parents already know and *only* what they are capable of teaching, then you narrow that child’s life in immeasurable ways, and quite likely squander a talent they may have been born with that the parents don’t share.

  • Nea

    Socialization is learning how to deal with people who are different than you and people your own age

    Something which Walsh obviously doesn’t value, considering that petty parting swipe at the wider secular world. Why yes, Mr. Walsh, I do find that the majority of the people I meet are well adjusted… (or, considering that I mainly hang out with fellow SF/mystery fans) are bent in the same way I am without being unable to cope with the wider world.

  • Nea

    His implication is every child in your community is so awful that they must be avoided at all costs

    Well, it’s hell on the indoctrination when the kids meet someone different than them and realize they’re just regular people too.

  • Joyce

    Why is everything an either/or here? Either you homeschool or you drown your kid? That’s ridiculous. What about all the parents who don’t homeschool, and still take an active role in their child’s education? I’ve always worked with my child’s teachers, helped her with homework, and done whatever is needed to help her succeed. Next September she’s off to university with a nice scholarship. Hardly drowning. Does anyone listen to this guy and not laugh?

  • persephone

    “And you’re telling me that the vast majority of the people you meet are ‘socially well adjusted’?”

    Yes, Matt, they are. If they weren’t, you wouldn’t be able to leave your home ever, at all.

  • And someone should really take the time to remind these biblical types what Christ said about the consequences of squandering talents. When God gives a gift, no matter WHAT that gift may be or how these patriarchal men may or may not value it, that gift is intended to be used. How many gifts are going unused and undeveloped because these men tell their wives and daughters that they aren’t supposed to be anything other than what they tell them they’re supposed to be?

  • SAO

    Yes, like the woman’s intelligence, reason and judgment.

  • Hannah

    It’s not so much “leaving your kid at the pool for six hours unattended” as it is taking your kid down to a set swim class, where they’ll actually be supervised and taught *how* to swim. They’re not unattended, they’re just attended by someone else who can teach them a skill that the parents may not know how to teach.

  • Also inborn leadership. Some *women* are born to lead just as some men aren’t. Let’s face it, strict gender roles hurt EVERYONE and hamstring a people by leaving resources ignored and undeveloped.

    I’m almost frightened to think of what these fundie types would do to reinterpret the Parable of the Talents to support their prejudices. ‘Cause it’s one thing to mangle the words of the Apostles… but Christ’s own words? Even at my most bass-ackwards I knew that there was no arguing with those quotes.

  • Nea

    Excuses I have heard for ignoring Jesus:

    1) The sermon on the mount doesn’t apply until after the second coming.

    2) The parable of the talents is 100% about money, and supports unregulated capitalism.

    3) It doesn’t matter what you say to a non-Christian; they’re headed to hell anyway.

  • *facepalm* And every time I think it can’t get worse… it does. I bow to your greater experience with the hypocrites of Christianity. As for #3, I suggest that the more truthful statement is “it doesn’t matter what you say to a Fundie, they’re not going to hear you anyway…”

  • Jewel

    Funny, my brother and I were dropped off at the pool for hours daily during the summer, and we became exceptional swimmers. How did I miss the pot and I-phones in the bathroom?

  • Astrin Ymris

    I wonder if Mr. Walsh has ever considered the possibility that HE’S the one with the “social adjustment” problems, and that’s why he has trouble with the “vast majority” of the people he meets?

  • Mel

    I walked to the pool with my siblings – while crossing major streets, too – and became a pretty good swimmer.

  • Nightshade

    ‘If you limit a child’s education to *only* what the parents already know
    and *only* what they are capable of teaching, then you narrow that
    child’s life in immeasurable ways, and quite likely squander a talent
    they may have been born with that the parents don’t share.’ And each generation will be less educated, because most parents aren’t capable of teaching everything they have learned (we do forget things-do any of us remember anything we learned in school?), so the child will learn less than the parents originally did, and will do the same in turn to the next generation.

  • Edie Moore McGee

    Walsh has a way of reducing complex, nuanced issues down to a simple yes-no “let’s ignore the nuances and do it MY way” sort of argument. The sign of an uneducated mind. Oh, wait. That what he IS.

  • Karen Burch

    It’s really unfair to non-homeschooling parents to assume that their sending kids to school constitutes “abandonment” or in any way implies a lack of interactivity. Do QF/P-ers just assume that public school parents never speak to their kids, or keep an eye on things? My parents were very intentional about how they interacted with me and my schooling and devoted just as much care to making sure that I was healthy and happy at school as any homeschooling parent, and I’m sure a lot of other public-school parents are too. My parents understood that going to school and being away from them was important for me to mature as a person, but that didn’t stop them from being hands-on with my education and socialization.

  • Rebecca Anderson

    The other day I asked my 16 year old brother (who was homeschooled grades 1 – 7) if he would homeschool his children, and he sighed regretfully and said, ‘No, I don’t want them to be social outcasts.’
    Straight from the horse’s mouth!