Quoting Quiverfull: When Patriarchals Misunderstand What ‘Taliban’ Means?

Quoting Quiverfull: When Patriarchals Misunderstand What ‘Taliban’ Means? May 25, 2014

by Adam Gregorin from his blog Minthegap – Fundamentalist Atheists –  America’s Taliban

However, there is a vocal minority of Atheists (I term them Fundamentalist Atheists) that seek to eradicate all religion, and these are the focus of this article.

It doesn’t take long reading Fundamentalist Atheist’s thoughts to find that they believe that Christians are the American version of the Taliban.  They trot out the ideas that Christians are behind unequal rights for gays and telling women what to do with their bodies, and compare that to the Taliban telling women that they are of no worth and that they must veil themselves from head to toe.

What they miss is the fact that on a larger scale, they are actually America’s Taliban.

 

The Fundamentalist Atheists have come upon a land that tolerates their absurd belief that there is no higher power, and they have decided to make war with the foundations of that society.  They forced the schools to remove Christian teachings, readings and moral instruction under the guise of equality.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but Jewish, Muslim and other religions, though they may not have agreed with such teachings, were not behind the movement to take God out of school.

But their most Taliban like act is how they have behaved toward the ceremonial religion of the nation.  While they may have screamed and howled over the fact that the Middle Eastern Taliban destroyed sculptures that dated back thousands of years as they attempted to purify their country of “false religion”, they do the very same thing here, striking out against postings of the Ten Commandments, Crosses, and the Pledge of Allegiance.

Indeed, cultural heritage means nothing to the Fundamentalist Atheist, as he attempts to rewrite history and the Founders to make Atheists and Agnostics out of them for the purposes of thrusting their own beliefs on the people.  Many will state that “many of the Founders were Deists” which is to equate them with Atheism, when the reality is quite different.

Read the entire posting at Minthegap

QUOTING QUIVERFULL is a regular feature of NLQ – we present the actual words of noted Quiverfull leaders and ask our readers: What do you think? Agree? Disagree? This is the place to state your opinion. Please, let’s keep it respectful – but at the same time, we encourage readers to examine the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

Comments open below

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement by Kathryn Joyce

13:24 – A Story of Faith and Obsession by M Dolon Hickmon


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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Yes, there are fundamentalist atheists. Yes, there are fundamentalist Christians. Yes, there are fundamentalist Muslims.

    Gregorin jumps right over the reasons why some atheists, myself included, consider certain factions within Christian fundamentalism the equivalent of the Taliban. He lists some the reasons and then ignores them. Instead, without any justification, he equates atheism with the Taliban.

    Most atheists I know, again myself included, are not out to destroy religion. I recognize most people believe in god and they are free to do so. My objection comes when the Christian religion demands preferential treatment, government funds and tax breaks, and demands that their interpretation of the Bible and its moral code be codified or taught to public school students. America is a secular state, with a strict separation of church and state. It is the encroachment of Christianity on the state that I object to.

    Deism? Show me one Evangelical church that would permit someone with deist beliefs to join their church? Deists were not atheists but they sure as hell weren’t Evangelicals.

    I will agree with Gregorin on one point. Atheist groups spend way too much time fighting the public ceremonial aspects of Christianity. But, like with the Taliban, give Evangelicals an inch and they will take a mile. (As they did in the McCarthy era when God was added to the pledge, currency, and special tax breaks were given to churches, clergy)

    When I entered the ministry in the 1970’s, virtually every Baptist believed in a strict separation of church and state. Five decades later Baptists now argue that there is no separation of church and state. Why? They are drunk with political power and like the Catholic church centuries ago they want more power, authority, and control.

    It is for these reasons and more that I think some Christian fundamentalists are like the Taliban. Everyone, Christians included, should fight these enemies of freedom. They are not for tolerance, plurality, or diversity. They want total control, turning America into a theocratic state where only their brand of Christianity is permitted to exist. We need only to look to England in the 15-17th century to see what happens when church and state are one. Freedom is lost and people die.

  • Nightshade

    ‘They trot out the ideas that Christians are behind unequal rights for gays and telling women what to do with their bodies.’ Aren’t they (mostly)?

  • Nea

    I’ll take false equivalence and excluded middle for $200, Alex.

    they have decided to make war with the foundations of that society.

    Not according to founding father John Adams ( the Government of the United States of America is not, in any
    sense, founded on the Christian religion) or founding father Thomas Jefferson (who took a razor to his bible to remove all the miracles.)

    While they may have screamed and howled over the fact that the Middle
    Eastern Taliban destroyed sculptures that dated back thousands of years… , they do
    the very same thing here, striking out against postings of the Ten
    Commandments, Crosses, and the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Which are also artworks thousands of years old? Really?

    Thing is, it’s not the atheists who remove the postings, crosses, etc on public land. It’s those judges, who are following the clear intent of the founding fathers again. You know, the ones who wrote that pesky First Amendment.

  • It is for these reasons and more that I think some Christian fundamentalists are like the Taliban. Everyone, Christians included, should fight these enemies of freedom. They are not for tolerance, plurality, or diversity. They want total control, turning America into a theocratic state where only their brand of Christianity is permitted to exist. We need only to look to England in the 15-17th century to see what happens when church and state are one. Freedom is lost and people die.

    Hear, hear.

  • Independent Thinker

    To the best of my knowledge when a sculpture, piece of artwork, or other item is removed by a judge from public land the option is in place to just put it somewhere else. I am not aware of judges actually ordering artwork to be destroyed.

  • Nea

    I think one of the 10 commandments was covered in cement when it was ruled illegal and the people who put it up refused to move it, but I’d have to look that up. Yes, they’ve never been wantonly destroyed just for existing.

  • Trollface McGee

    *Yawn* the “atheists took God out of schools” line again? It’s getting tiresome. The major cases that prohibited mandatory organised Christian prayer or Bible reading weren’t brought by atheists. Engel v. Vitale was brought by Jewish families. Shempp was a Unitarian. Other cases were brought by atheists, or Catholics, etc. And none of them took prayer out of schools. Students have a Constitutional right to pray in school, to bring the Bible to school, to organise Bible clubs, as long as they aren’t cutting into instructional time or harrassing other students.

    “They trot out the ideas that Christians are behind unequal rights for gays and telling women what to do with their bodies, and compare that to the Taliban telling women that they are of no worth and that they must veil themselves from head to toe.”
    I notice he does nothing to refute this point.
    It’s the intrusion and taking away of other people’s human rights that bothers most people about the Taliban, not the fact that they’ve changed some ceremonies.

  • Your last paragraph deserves to be bolded: It’s the intrusion and taking away of other people’s human rights that bothers most people about the Taliban, not the fact that they’ve changed some ceremonies.

  • SAO

    The foundation documents of America are Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. You won’t see any mention of Jesus or Christ in any of those documents.

    The Declaration of Independence refers to “Nature’s God,” our “Creator,” and “Divine Providence,” words that work in many religions, for example, I suspect Ancient Romans would have no trouble believing that they apply to their gods.

    The Constitution and Bill of Rights don’t mention God at all (except because, as with the convention of the time, the dates were written as “In the year of our Lord, 1787”)

    Further, our founding fathers, all of whom Gregorin claims were Christians specifically put in the first amendment: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

    Ergo, America’s foundation is on the right of every American to practice whatever religion they choose or to not practice any. And to proclaim their beliefs to whomever will listen.

  • Nea

    Furthermore, Adams wrote in a treaty that America was not founded on the Christian religion, while Jefferson’s quote about separation of church and state (“It’s in a letter!” fundamentalists cry, “not in the Constitution!”) was directly referencing the First Amendment. Franklin complained the minute Congress started opening with a prayer.

    When you look at what the founding fathers actually wrote rather than what Barton tells you they wrote, their intentions are crystal clear. Different religion than you? Well, that neither picks a pocket nor breaks a leg, so who cares?

  • Mario Strada

    Maybe there are “Fundamentalist Atheists” I don’t know. I have not met any so far.

    For starters, “Fundamentalism is the demand for a strict adherence to orthodox theological doctrines usually understood as a reaction against Modernist theology”

    Atheism only creed is the non belief in gods and it has no theology. By that standard, it cannot be fundamentalist; or, if we take the basic tenet as its theology, every atheist is a fundamentalist.

    There are some that are more strict that others, some that profess “antitheism”. An Antitheist is not strictly an atheist. That’s what the different term is for: a different belief.

    Of course, I know what the writer of the piece is referring to: those atheists that have stopped humoring the religious majority and actually express their ideas, including forging the religious to abide by the laws of the nation. The balls.

  • lodrelhai

    The pastor at my old church claimed that Deism was the term at the time for non-denominational Christianity. I have NO idea where he got this idea from, but he stated it from the pulpit a few times a year.

    This was, unsurprisingly, in a non-denominational (and fundamentalist) Christian church.

  • Allison the Great

    Exactly. When we say that they’re about persecuting the gays or controlling women, we’re just going by their behaviors and what they say. We’re not making this shit up.

  • Allison the Great

    I find it almost funny that this man believes Barton, and then accuses everyone else of “rewriting history”.

  • gimpi1

    “Indeed, cultural heritage means nothing to the Fundamentalist Atheist, as he attempts to rewrite history and the Founders to make Atheists and Agnostics out of them for the purposes of thrusting their own beliefs on the people.”

    Apparently they don’t teach about Thomas Paine in in many homeschool curriculums. Common sense, anyone?

  • gimpi1

    I think the Baptists embraced separation of Church and State because they were afraid of Catholic dominance. Now, because they see themselves as being the ones doing the dominating, they reject the idea. You’re right, Bruce. It’s about power.

    “Freedom is lost and people die.” Yes, indeed.

  • gimpi1

    Ah, yes, David Barton. The Ken Ham of American history.