YouTube Promotes Chiropractic “Skeletal Crack” Videos on Twitter

YouTube Promotes Chiropractic “Skeletal Crack” Videos on Twitter October 19, 2019

YouTube has come under fire for a tweet sent yesterday promoting alternative medicine, with the company saying videos featuring chiropractic adjustments contain “skeletal cracks” you can listen to “for HOURS.”

Is she enjoying that or hating it?
Screen grab from a Youtube chiropractic video with more than 10 million views.

The “cracking” videos appear to be incredibly popular on YouTube, which could be why the video hosting platform wanted to draw even more attention to them with this controversial tweet:

Regardless of the company’s intentions, several activists and Twitter users had a problem with the promotion of chiropractic, which is considered by many to be a pseudo-scientific practice responsible for the deaths of several different people. Among those deaths was model Katie May.

Days before the 34-year-old died in February, she posted on Twitter that she’d pinched a nerve in her neck at a photoshoot and was going to visit a chiropractor. Friends said she became sick a few hours after her appointment and was taken to the emergency room. She was pronounced brain dead the next day and taken off life support.

The LA County Coroner said her death, while accidental, was caused by “vertebral artery dissection” – a tear in one of the major arteries that carries blood to the brain, caused by the chiropractic treatment.

“This is actually more common than people think — that people get over-adjusted and there’s a tear and it causes a stroke and death,” said Ronald Richards, Katie May estate’s lawyer.

While thousands of people have favorited YouTube’s advertisement for chiropractic, some criticized the move. One person commenting drew attention to the company’s demonetization efforts.

Others seemed to think the promotion of chiropractic was a potential slippery slope.

A few people also pointed out the apparent hypocrisy of a company that recently promised to demonetize anti-vaccination videos now promoting chiropractic.

The chiropractic field has experienced its fair share of controversy, so there’s no telling if the pushback against YouTube will affect the popular videos. Still, it’s interesting to see the sides of this debate present their perspectives.

So, what do you think?


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