Why the Scientifically Literate Can Believe Silly Things

Why the Scientifically Literate Can Believe Silly Things August 3, 2011

Jim Kidder pointed to and quoted from a piece in Discover Magazine by Chris Mooney, and this quote from it is worth circulating widely:

If you understand motivated reasoning, then you understand that high levels of knowledge, education, and sophistication are no defense against wrongheaded views like climate change denial and anti-evolutionism.  What I’ll call “sophistication” may even make these phenomena worse, at least among those with deeply ideological or religious views.

The reason is that when we “reason” in areas where we have strong beliefs, our emotions come first and then we rationalize our pre-existing views. And those better at generating self-affirming arguments will be better rationalizers, will fall in love with their own seemingly brilliant arguments, and their minds will become harder to change (but they’ll love to argue).

"I agree that specific numbers have little value.I would think we would want to start ..."

Jesus, Probably
"I'm not sure Bernier's examples are well-chosen, because they do invite the kind of response ..."

Jesus, Probably
"Thank you for revealing once again that your qualms and ironically dogmatic agnosticism are based ..."

Jesus, Probably
"Bernier's article perfectly captures my qualms about the mainstream consensus on the probability of the ..."

Jesus, Probably

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  • Anonymous

    This buttresses that the more educated one is, the more one can ratonalize in favor of ” The Transcendental Temptation,” Paul Kurtz’s must read book so that we note the rationalist fallacy of thinkng that with more education, less superstition results.

  • carneadesofga

    This buttresses that the more educated one is, the more one can ratonalize in favor of ” The Transcendental Temptation,” Paul Kurtz’s must read book so that we note the rationalist fallacy of thinkng that with more education, less superstition results.