Round-Up: Talpiot Tomb and James Ossuary Latest

Round-Up: Talpiot Tomb and James Ossuary Latest March 15, 2012

Here’s my round-up combining the latest from the blogosphere on two key archaeological topics that are featuring prominently in news and blogs: the Talpiot tombs and their ossuaries, and the conclusion of the James ossuary forgery trial.

James Tabor makes an attempt at satire, but I don’t think it works very well. He also draws attention to the release of new photos, and clarifies that some images previously circulated were created based on multiple photos taken from a variety of angles.

Bob Cargill discusses the base of the vase (or seaweed-engulfed head of Jonah), followed up by Steve Caruso depicting what happens when you adjust the angle/perspective on the fish/vase on the Talpiot ossuary.

Mark Goodacre spotted a mislabeled ossuary which had caused some confusion. He provides further details from both himself and James Tabor in a follow-up post.

Christopher Rollston discusses the four-line inscription on the ASOR blog.

See also the round-up by David Meadows at RogueClassicist, as well as images and information he has shared on Pinterest.

There’s an article about the topic in the Jewish Daily Forward.

Bible History Daily has reactions from Oded Golan and Robert Deutsch (the latter says he plans to sue the IAA).

The IAA response to the trial verdict has been reposted on the ASOR blog (original here).

Note that the article “Authenticity Examination of the Inscription on the Ossuary Attributed to James, Brother of Jesus” is accessible online on Academia.edu.

Jim Davila reflects on the verdict, as do Michael Heiser, John Byron, The Archaeological Review and many others.

Matthew Kalman has reposted on his blog his pieces in The Independent and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Ferrell Jenkins sums up the current situation: “Today, and in the months to come, the reaction to this court decision will likely be along this line. Those who “knew” that the ossuary inscription was a fake, still think it is a fake. Those who thought the full inscription is genuine, still think it is genuine. Those who did not know whether the inscription was genuine or a fake still do not know. That is where I stand.”

Channel 4 has a video on the subject.

Bible and Interpretation has collected a range of articles on the James ossuary and the trial.

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