Do the Fundamentalist Rocks Cry Out?

Do the Fundamentalist Rocks Cry Out? August 22, 2015

Fundamentalists say that the Bible must be trustworthy in everything it says – about nature, science, history, or any other topic – or else it isn’t trustworthy in what it says about God.

Let’s see what happens if we apply the same logic to the natural world.

The Bible says that the created things give reliable testimony to their Creator. In Romans 1:20, we read, “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.” And Psalm 19:1 says, “The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.”

And yet young-earth creationists claim that we cannot trust what the evidence of the natural world points to regarding their history.

I think this may be a point worth making to young-earth creationists. Their arguments about the Bible and their arguments about the natural world directly contradict one another.

And don’t let them claim that in the case of the natural world the issue is interpretation of the witness that is borne, since no one at this point should find it at all plausible that reading the Bible does not involve interpretation.

Romans 1.20 Updated

 

 

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  • Roger Messner

    Great post!

    But does an updated Romans 1:20 help the conversation or continue the argument?

    • I’m not sure. The meme is one I made quite some time ago, but it seemed worth including at the end of this post. What do you think?

      • Roger Messner

        Not saying I don’t agree.

        Your post carries a lot of weight that the rare open fundamentalist rock should logically be willing to consider. In that light the meme may then feel like a sucker punch to the vulnerability that this mythical fundy rock afforded you.

        I am just looking for new ways to have this conversation that doesn’t make our family look like freaks arguing over their reverse zombie god (he wants us to eat him) and their secret origin stories.

  • otrotierra

    An interesting dilemma. But Young Earth fundamentalists like Ken Ham despise geology just as much as theology. They are equally intolerant of both science and biblical scholarship. At the center of their universe is their own narrow, self-centered, self-serving, profit-driven opinion.

  • Phil Ledgerwood

    Cueing the angry YECers in five… four… three…

  • arcseconds

    We surely know the YEC response to this. You may be right to insist that no-one should find it plausible that reading the Bible does not involve interpretation, but that is nevertheless a fairly likely response. On the other hand they usually insist that ‘historical’ science does require interpretation of the evidence, and the options are the lens of man’s fallible opinion, or the lens of the infallible Word of God.

    So will they not just insist that when interpreted through their preferred lens, what the rocks are crying out is that they were either created directly by God a few thousand years ago, or else they were deposited in a global flood?

    • Except that anyone who actually looks at the rocks – never mind studying them using specialized instruments – will, if they are honest, recognize that the flood explanation doesn’t wash (pun intended). Plus there is no record of the global flood being multi-global, and so the rock layers on Mars are even harder to account for.

      • arcseconds

        Yes, but surely they need to understand what an honest look at the rocks demonstrates before they can understand your point about scripture, don’t they? Pointing out that scripture tells us to look at the natural world to understand God doesn’t help if they already think they are looking at the natural world.

        And once they have understood what the rocks say, then is there anything more that needs to be done?

        If there are any YECs that just openly refuse to even look like they’re looking at rocks (like the people who refused to look through Galileo’s telescope) , maybe this point would be an important one, but the ones we interact with, at least, aren’t like that.

        So your tactic here just seems to boil down to getting them to acknowledge what the evidence actually is, and we try that already and it doesn’t usually get us very far.

        I confess that I don’t really understand how the YEC mind works, so maybe starting off with “the heaven’s declare the creator’s glory!” (would it help to sing it to Beethoven’s tune? I like that tune…) would help, but I’m not seeing it at the moment…

  • Dave Again

    I don’t think many young earth creationists would be likely to produce ‘Termites’. Their gene pool is just too shallow.

  • DutchS

    Romans 13: “Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. 2 Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves.”

    When it comes to describing the way the world works, scientists, not clergy, are the lawful authorities.