menu

An Invitation to Disruption: A Call to White Churches

An Invitation to Disruption: A Call to White Churches August 20, 2014

It was July 19, 2013, and we were leaving New York City for a spiritual retreat, six days after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman “not guilty” in the death of Trayvon Martin. The sadness, anger, and weariness was well worn on the liturgies, prayers, and preaching of many of the churches in our Harlem neighborhood.

We found ourselves joining local church leaders and a few pastors in a conversation about justice that would eventually make its way toward a broad range of matters: the gay rights of questioning teens, clean water for children in Africa, and many of the frequent places conversations go with folks who are concerned with “loving our neighbor.” And so we sat, we listened, and were genuinely moved to openly share about the challenges and opportunities that have come with cultivating safe spaces for GBLT folks in our church community. TOGETHER we also inspired one another as we offered our collective experiences with integrating the arts in fundraising for international relief efforts.

And as Jose and I sat, listened, and shared TOGETHER, we found ourselves with heavy hearts waiting …“Would the conversation broach the tragedy of Trayvon Martin?” It didn’t.

And as we sat TOGETHER in sacred solidarity with compassionate, justice-minded pastors, who happened to be white, somehow we found ourselves feeling quite alone. So we mustered the courage to ask, “How have your churches responded to the Trayvon Martin verdict?” My question was met with silence. The silence that met us did not betray aloof or timid spirits, but rather uncertainty about whether their one voice could really make a difference, or that somehow they did not have the right to “speak on behalf” of brown and black realities. And it is also important to emphasize that the silence we met is not the endemic response of all-white churches; there are many that have moved beyond the silence and have joined in undoing the wrongs of racism. Nevertheless, the silence that we met is not uncommon in many white churches across America, for example Emerson’s (1999) study showed that only 27 percent of white evangelicals agreed that discrimination plays a role in current racial inequalities.

Read the rest here

"But why is church so boring? And why is it still getting tax breaks?"

Dear White Church Leaders: A Letter ..."
"Not with me-I avoid talking with people and I am self-sufficient; no HR department has ..."

Dear White Church Leaders: A Letter ..."
"How will you find out who's been silent? And why is church so boring?"

Dear White Church Leaders: A Letter ..."

Browse Our Archives