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Thanks In Large Part to the Efforts of Non-believers, Afghan Immigrants Enjoy Religious Freedom in America

Thanks In Large Part to the Efforts of Non-believers, Afghan Immigrants Enjoy Religious Freedom in America September 15, 2021

Already just a few weeks old, it’s amazing just how quickly the country of Afghanistan went from being one of the US’s most important “national interests” to a bad memory the country would like to collectively forget.

At least one priority is still making headlines, and that’s our focus on the Afghan people. Heroic attempts are still ongoing to free the remaining Americans and those Afghans who helped the US in its efforts to bring Afghanistan into the modern era and to escape a life under Taliban rule.

Related story from the Religious News Service: Racial and religious profiling remains a legacy of 9/11 — one we must end.

What newly arriving immigrants may not understand is that the religious tolerance they will enjoy is due primarily to the efforts of non-believers in gods. For it’s the ongoing work of freethinkers, secularists, humanists, atheists and other non-believing individuals who have created the culture in which religious freedom can thrive. / Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Still threatened by Islam?

A lot of Americans feel threatened by the influx of Afghans into America and into other western countries. To put it bluntly: it’s because 99.7 % of Afghans are Muslim who ascribe to the tenets of Islam. Islam also happens to be the fastest growing religions in the world.

Freeing Afghans from Taliban rule is the right thing to do. Whether it is physically removing Afghans from their own country as they desire, or by the global community’s attempts to still have a presence in Afghanistan and drag its theocracy-minded overlords into the 21st century.

Nevertheless, I’m still wary of Islamic religious ideologies invading our country. Lest I be deemed a religious bigot, I’m just as wary of the influence of Christian evangelicals in our society. Perhaps I should just come right out and say it, I’m intolerant of the intolerance expressed by any fundamentalist extremists in America no matter what religion they follow or what country they come from.

The Afghan people still need the world’s help in their attempt to flee Islamic extremism in their own country. They sense that in America and in other countries we value religious freedom, and that they’ll be free to worship as they choose.

Thank the unbelievers for religious tolerance

What newly arriving immigrants may not understand is that the religious tolerance they will enjoy is due primarily to the efforts of non-believers in gods. For it’s the ongoing work of freethinkers, secularists, humanists, atheists and other non-believing individuals who have created the culture in which religious freedom can thrive. It is precisely the “intolerance” for religious fanaticism by nonbelievers, and their continued efforts to hold religious fanatics in check, that has created a culture in American in which mild and reasonable forms of religious beliefs can still thrive.

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About Scott R Stahlecker
Scott Stahlecker is a former minister and now writes for Thinkadelics about the joys and benefits of living as a freethinker. He is the author of the novel Blind Guides and Picking Wings Off Butterflies. You can read more about the author here.

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8 responses to “Thanks In Large Part to the Efforts of Non-believers, Afghan Immigrants Enjoy Religious Freedom in America”

  1. Don’t worry now that they’re in a country that doesn’t force religion on them under pain of death, apostasy will skyrocket. Islam is the religion most likely to lose adherents when religious freedom is respected.

  2. That’s an optimistic way of looking at it, and I see it that way too. Americans and many other western countries have spent the last 20 years in Afghanistan giving its citizens a taste of freedom. I’m counting on their apostasy.

  3. Maybe apostasy will skyrocket and maybe not. Those who are surrounded by Rill Murkkkuns who are Kriss-chuns might cling to their faith in the face of outright intolerance and violence.

  4. Military dependent: when we moved to the USA in the mid-1980s, it was in the south and the anti-Catholic hatred astounded me. It was built in everywhere and what they were saying were such obvious lies that I found it astounding. Having lived in several majority-Catholic countries, I knew that Catholics were Christians despite what the Baptists claimed.

    What I also noticed was the people around me who identified as Catholic dug their heels in and remained Catholic.

    A similar thing happened in Ireland during The Troubles.

  5. I had a Catholic tell me one time, “I’m not Christian, I’m Catholic.” This surprised me, because it was the first and only time I had heard a Catholic distancing themselves from being a Christian. I doubt this kind of thing happens in Ireland. Seems like there is a clear distinction between those who call themselves Catholics and Christians.

  6. Really? Wow. I have only heard Catholics assert that the are Christian…in fact, the first Christians before Martin Luther nailed the theses on the door in 1599 and created the Prostesant schism, which has been schisming ever since.

    One thing I’ve heard countless times from the Baptists is that “Baptists predated Jesus!” If I want to make them angry, I say, “So, you’re not actually Christians, then? Christians are followers of Jesus Christ and you say you came before him.” They never have an answer to that.

    Usually I just point out that the Baptist schism of Christianity came from the Anabaptist schism (the same one that brought you the Amish), which itself came from the Protestant schism of 1599. Which was 1500 centuries after Jesus supposedly walked the Earth.

    Most Baptists have absolutely no idea what I’m talking about.

  7. Really. And he was adamant about it, like he wanted nothing to do with being labeled a Christian. I’be been to that church, in Wittenberg, when I lived in Germany. I was still a Christian at the time and made a pilgrimage out there.

    I’ve never heard that about the Baptists. That’s ridiculous. Technically, they are a protestant denomination and protestants didn’t exist until 1599 is you pointed out.

    My own former church, the Adventists, believe they are the remnant of God’s people living on earth. The last of God’s chosen people that have THE final message of warning to give to the inhabitants of planet earth. Adventists came on the scene around 1844, along with Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons.

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