Poll tells us that millennials are less religious. w00t!

Poll tells us that millennials are less religious. w00t! April 14, 2014

Good news on the polling front!

Barely half of millennials say they look to religion for guidance, but a higher percentage “talk to God,” suggesting that the 18-to-34 demographic is more spiritual than sectarian, according to a new survey by the Integrated Innovation Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The survey of 2,000 U.S. men and women, ages 18-34, found that 62 percent said they talk to God, while 52 percent said they look to religion for guidance.

There’s really no way to spin this, fewer people in this generation, by far, claim to speak with god.  Even fewer are looking to religion for any sort of guidance.

And of the ones who do claim to look to religion for guidance, I wonder how many read something like the golden rule in the bible (y’know, something they’d already figured out on their own) and take that as “looking to religion for guidance.”

This caught me though:

African-Americans were most likely to say they talk to God (78 percent) and look to religion (67 percent), while Asian-Americans were least likely to report that they talk to God (57 percent). Just over half of Asian-Americans (51 percent) said they look to religion for guidance.

This confirms global data that correlates more fervent and widespread religious belief wherever poverty is greater.  Since African-Americans are more likely to be living in poverty in America, it makes sense that they are more likely to believe themselves to be speaking with god.  It’s something evangelists know: when people have more need, they’re more likely to be so desperate for good news/help that they’ll accept a con that they otherwise would reject if their lives were more comfortable.

This should be a message to atheists: if you want less religion, fix poverty, fix inequality.  For those atheists who wonder why social justice like this should matter, there’s one of many reasons.


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