The Battle Lines are Drawn

My family has an ugly history with mouse infestation. I largely attribute my first descent into postpartum depression (back in 2006) to the pregnant mice of West Philadelphia who set up their labor and delivery unit in our one-bedroom apartment right around the time I brought home my second newborn. But, praise God, the memories have faded. We have been living mouse-free since 2009.

Until today. When I found mouse scat sprinkled in and around my baby’s highchair (a midnight snack of leftover Cheerios, no doubt) and in the kitchen.

Clearly our newest rodent addition hasn’t heard the tale of how our last mouse was executed under the moonlight back in ’09.

The floors are immaculate. The glue traps are down and baited. Stage I is underway, and it only gets more grisly from here. I’m cautiously optimistic.

The only difference this time around is my son is requesting to keep the mouse as a pet once we catch it. What do you think?

  • http://www.buildingcathedrals.com/ Kellie

    He is probably just fondly remembering his infant days. It was like attachment parenting for him, except he grew fond of mice. Dr. Sears would be proud. How funny if he gets a mouse as a pet when he is older….

  • Kat0427

    Nooooooo! I will pray for a quick battle and a swift victory for you guys. I’m sorry that you’re going through this ordeal, but maybe this will make the prospect of a move that much sweeter?? Keep us posted!

  • AMDG

    My heart goes out to you and my prayers are with you! When our first son was 9 months old we discovered that we had not one but many mice co-habitating with us in our tiny townhouse. I had been in the fog of ppd for so long that I did not even notice all the signs and was horrified when, late one night, I walked into our
    pantry and was confronted by several of the little mice snacking on our food.
    The anxiety it caused me compelled us to leave our house for a month
    while it was cleaned and all the mice were eliminated. However, I will
    say what finally got rid of them were these small (about the size of a
    half-dollar), white devices that you plug into your wall outlets (we found them
    at Lowes). They emit a high level frequency that deters a mouse from
    entering or moving around the house. We now live in a home surrounded by
    woods and still use them…so far we are mouse free. And, although I did
    come to name the collective group Napoleon, since they were small but caused
    much strife, I can’t imagine having one as a pet!!

  • Kat0427

    AMDG, we use those in the garage and attic – ours are larger and have a red light, and they are meant to deter rats, mice, and squirrels from walking on the electric lines, which they often do. We have had rats and mice in our garage and shed, and raccoons and rats in our attic. Yuck!
    JM, can you call an exterminator to come help? The glue traps are a good idea as opposed to the poison, because you don’t want them dying in some other part of your house!

  • frazer

    We had a similar situation, and a similar request re keeping one as a pet. We checked with a rodent expert at our local medical school, and he advised against it–wild mice can carry diseases. If your son wants one, get it from a pet store.

  • Mrs C

    Bwah! We’re having the exact same problem in our new house! My great-white-mouse-hunter husband has caught 4 in the last week. My little girl keeps asking to pet them.


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