To the Marketing Director: These Are Not the Droids You’re Looking For

In my house, we make a practice of laughing at commercials. We mock them to remind ourselves that they’re selling something, that they’re probably lying (with the help of photo editing and airbrushing), and that the products we buy don’t define us.

But recent Droid commercials are so disturbing that I can barely stand to watch them, much less laugh at them. In this spot (currently airing on Hulu), a man is strapped into a chair in a dark laboratory, with the Droid phone attached just over his heart:

http://youtu.be/Slv3KqY6p6E

As the human uploads the powers of the phone, his hearing, eyesight, and sense of touch expand. Like something out of The Matrix or Battlestar Galactica, the human is becoming a machine—and not only that, but such a development, Droid claims, is an “upgrade” to the human “self.”

Android has a whole series of commercials in this vein, full of dark, cyberpunk-y, gritty, and dystopian imagery about humans giving in to the machines in our lives and being re-molded in their image. (Compare that to Apple commercials, which are usually about making technology serve us: They’re warmer, lighter, more humanistic, and utopian. I think I know which image I prefer.)

Though questionable in terms of marketing value (who wants to be a Droid?), the commercials do raise valuable philosophical questions. Can upgrading your phone help you upgrade your “self”? What comprises the “self”?

Questions about the interplay of technology and selfhood are nothing new, granted. The new technology of the printing press, for example, fostered the growth of the notion of the individual self. This new sense of individual identity led to the Protestant Reformation and to the growth of the novel, “the literary form that developed as an expression of the modern subject: the record of individual, particular and progressive experience. In both form and content, the novel embodies the rise of the individual, and with that, the individual’s quest for identity.”

How, then, will laptops, cell phones, and tablets once again alter our evolving sense of individual selfhood? Books have already been written on this topic, and we’ve got much more to learn. (Frankly, the advertisers for the Droid ought to go watch some Battlestar Galactica before they try to contend that cylons are an improvement on humans.)

But regardless of what we still need to learn, there’s one thing we can say for certain, Android: Humans are not machines, and phones won’t ever “upgrade” our souls.

About Amy Lepine Peterson

Amy Lepine Peterson teaches ESL Writing and American Pop Culture at Taylor University, but spends most of her time making a home in the cornfields for her best-friend-husband and two (frankly adorable) children. Look for her with a french press of coffee and a book or a screen, plus a little one on her lap, thinking about education, mothering, theology, tv, movies, music, and sustainable habits of living.

  • http://www.thehighcalling.org Marcus Goodyear

    Wow. I’m stunned. Sometimes I wonder if our culture has thrown out the idea of renewal and redemption and replaced them with technology upgrades.

  • http://liter8.net Christopher Hutton

    Well, here’s an idea to throw around: What if the upgrading of our phone upgraded our ability to express our identity in the world? Would that be as negative as “becoming the machine”, or would it allow for the uniqueness of the human soul?

  • http://jaketolbert.com/blog Jake T

    Also, be careful not to make the mistake that the commercial (and branding of the “Droid” line of phones in general) wants you to make: namely that the Motorola Droid represents the entirety of the Android line, and therefore is the only brand option other than Apple.

    Android is a MUCH richer and wider ecosystem than the one brand being advertised here: unlike Apple, Android isn’t the phone + software pair–it’s only the software. Interestingly, Android’s marketing is much more lighthearted and cartoon-y–see https://www.google.com/search?q=android+logo&hl=en&tbo=d&rlz=1C1_____enUS454US454&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=bGcSUZi0FKPWyQG3yYHYDw&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAA&biw=1680&bih=989

    I’m not sure how Motorola got away with naming their phone “the Droid”–it’s utterly confusing when you can get any number phones, tablets or computers made by any number of other manufacturers that all run Android.

    But as you said in the beginning, it’s good to disarm these sorts of commercials and the myths they spin.

  • http://friarsfires.blogspot.com Brett

    I remember a commercial a few years back for an old version of SBC/Yahoo that said it was “internet that logs onto you,” as though that was supposed to be appealing. This strikes me as in the same vein.

  • CesD

    Humans are machines. Just because one is a eletrochemical machine made of carbon and the other is a eletromechanical machine made of metal, silicon and plastics doesn’t change that.


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