Charles Simeon on Romans

Here’s a charming quote from Charles Simeon on Romans 1

THE Epistle to the Romans, though first in order, is by no means first in point of time; several having, in fact, been written before it. But in respect of importance, it justly deserves to take the lead of all the others. There is no other that is so full and comprehensive on the great subject of a sinner’s justification before God; no other so orderly in its arrangement, or so argumentative in its statement; and perhaps no other that is, on the whole, so instructive. It was written to the Church at Rome, which, though not planted by St. Paul, had a distinguished place in his regard. He had long wished to visit that Church, but had been prevented, by a variety of circumstances, from carrying his purpose into execution. Now however he announced his intention of going to them the first opportunity, being desirous of “having some fruit among them even as he had had among other Gentiles.” He had reason indeed to expect, that, in that opulent city, the abode of so many great and learned men, his ministrations would excite no small measure of contempt: but “he was not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ;” nor did he think he had any occasion to be ashamed of it; since “it was, and would be, the power of God to the salvation of all who received it in faith.” It were well if all who profess to believe the Gospel, were likeminded with him in this particular: but there are multitudes who, notwithstanding they call themselves Christians, are in reality ashamed of the Gospel. That we may assist such persons in discovering their own character, and induce them to walk worthy of their holy profession.

Simeon, C. (1832-63). Horae Homileticae Vol. 15: Romans (9–10). London.


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