Things to Note

N.T. Wright talks about sacrifice in a video clip (HT: Brian LePort).

NT job opportunity at a Presbyterian College in Egypt (I’ve been learning some Egyptian Arabic recently and its fun) (HT: Daniel Kirk).

Having just purchased an iPad I’m naturally in Scot McKnight’s article about the iPad in the class room.

  • S Wu

    Tom Wright asks some very good questions. I am no OT expert, but as I study Paul I have done some thinking about OT sacrifice. I have been wondering whether our difficulty in understanding OT sacrifices and the Pauline understanding of atonement lies in the fact that we in the West seldom (if ever) participate in any form of sacrifices of animals. I spent the first part of my life in Asia, and in my former religion I used to go through regular rituals of sacrificing animals to please the “gods”. There are indeed a lot of social and anthropological meanings embedded in the sacrifices. They are not merely superstitious practices, for in their non-Western worldview people do not separate religious rituals from the realities of daily life. I think the OT sacrifices are unique in that the sacrifices were made to the Creator God (rather than the “gods” in pantheistic or polytheistic contexts). And the system and the form of the sacrifices are very different from that of other non-Christian systems and beliefs. What is even more important is that the Creator God of Israel is a God of love and he is faithful to his people. That makes the OT sacrificial system different from that of other systems.

  • S Wu

    Tom Wright asks some very good questions. I am no OT expert, but as I study Paul I have done some thinking about OT sacrifice. I have been wondering whether our difficulty in understanding OT sacrifices and the Pauline understanding of atonement lies in the fact that we in the West seldom (if ever) participate in any form of sacrifices of animals. I spent the first part of my life in Asia, and in my former religion I used to go through regular rituals of sacrificing animals to please the “gods”. There are indeed a lot of social and anthropological meanings embedded in the sacrifices. They are not merely superstitious practices, for in their non-Western worldview people do not separate religious rituals from the realities of daily life. I think the OT sacrifices are unique in that the sacrifices were made to the Creator God (rather than the “gods” in pantheistic or polytheistic contexts). And the system and the form of the sacrifices are very different from that of other non-Christian systems and beliefs. What is even more important is that the Creator God of Israel is a God of love and he is faithful to his people. That makes the OT sacrificial system different from that of other systems.


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