Latest CBR

In the latest issue of Currents in Biblical Research 11.3 (2013) including the following:

Jason Hood and Matthew Y. Emerson
“Summaries of Israel’s Story: Reviewing a Compositional Category”

Coleman A. Baker
“Peter and Paul in Acts and the Construction of Early Christian Identity: A Review of Historical and Literary Approaches”

Bruce Worthington
“Alternative Perspectives beyond the Perspectives: A Summary of Pauline Studies that has Nothing to Do with Piper or Wright”

Worthington looks at recent philosophical, post-colonial, ecological, feminist, and social-scientific readings of Paul and concludes:

As a result of this interpretive exercise, one looming hesitation remains. While I certainly appreciate the post-colonial, feminist and ecological re-reading against the grain, I am afraid that such readings rely too heavily on a false ‘original purity’ of primitive Christian origins. The logic of reconstruction implies a certain docetism, namely that human organization strategies are always a corrupting one, and that underneath the appearance of institutional domination and hegemony lies a pure Christian ethic of blissful togetherness. Reconstructions that function on the notion of original primitive purity are virginal narratives – relying on an origin ‘in abstraction’ from the frail contingencies of human interactions and complex power struggles. A less idealistic reading strategy might reject this as fantasy, and develop reading strategies that take seriously the human complexities of power ‘in the beginning.’

Perhaps a tad too general, but he is definitely onto something.

 

Bumper Issue of JSNT (2015)
Is Reformed Theology Still Relevant? (Michael Jensen)
What "Render to Caesar" Really Means!
Perhaps Feminism Is Not the Enemy! (Michael Jensen)

CLOSE | X

HIDE | X