Progressive Christianity for Children in the News

There is a new article at The Huffington Post by Deshna Ubeda on progressive Christianity and the education of children. I know from my own experience that it can be a struggle to find resources that will help children learn to appreciate a religious tradition, but not uncritically, and to be open to expecting to find truth in others’ viewpoints and perspectives.

I have spoken with people of a number of different religions, and no religion at all, who wrestle with this same issue or one very similar to it, namely how to teach values and pass on traditions to children without inculcating dogmatism in them.

What resources have you found useful? What challenges of this sort have you faced, and how did you tackle them?

  • Hjalti

    She claims that Jesus didn’t talk about heaven or hell. So she seems to be oblivious to the fact that she has created Jesus in her own image. Sounds like an uncritical liberal Christian to me. 

    And what exactly is left of “Christianity” in her “progressive Christianity”? She seems to want to chuck away the idea of a personal god (so clearly Jesus isn’t the god/a god according to her). 

  • Hjalti

    She claims that Jesus didn’t talk about heaven or hell. So she seems to be oblivious to the fact that she has created Jesus in her own image. Sounds like an uncritical liberal Christian to me. 

    And what exactly is left of “Christianity” in her “progressive Christianity”? She seems to want to chuck away the idea of a personal god (so clearly Jesus isn’t the god/a god according to her). 

  • http://triangulations.wordpress.com/ Sabio Lantz

    how to teach values and pass on traditions to children without inculcating dogmatism in them.

    Easy!  Stop teaching dogma laden myths.  Lots of great stuff out there without it.  No need to hang on to it just because your parents did.

    Besides, values are taught by living good examples (90%), we don’t need to tell the same old myths over and over to try to reinforce our good examples.  There are lots of good literature  to reinforce your favorite morality or why not just make up a great story — tell you kid bedtime stories.  Research shows that religion does not teach morality anyway — no?  Suspecting otherwise is one of the greatest myths of religion, no?

  • http://triangulations.wordpress.com/ Sabio Lantz

    how to teach values and pass on traditions to children without inculcating dogmatism in them.

    Easy!  Stop teaching dogma laden myths.  Lots of great stuff out there without it.  No need to hang on to it just because your parents did.

    Besides, values are taught by living good examples (90%), we don’t need to tell the same old myths over and over to try to reinforce our good examples.  There are lots of good literature  to reinforce your favorite morality or why not just make up a great story — tell you kid bedtime stories.  Research shows that religion does not teach morality anyway — no?  Suspecting otherwise is one of the greatest myths of religion, no?

  • http://www.patheos.com/community/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

    @5c6661af0c2e70ec1f5386878c93e76f:disqus , I think Jesus might have agreed with her about whether or not he was (a) God.  :-)

    @Sabio:disqus , presumably you don’t object to kids learning Greek and Roman myths. The problem is with their being told – usually at a slightly older age – that unlike all other stories of the fantastic, these ones are factual. Of course, some of the “best Biblical children’s stories? are in fact R-rated stories for adults that have been turned into stories for children precisely by the paring away of the sex, murder, gore and intrigue. But when they get older, the Brick Testament will fill them in on those details…

  • http://www.patheos.com/community/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

    @5c6661af0c2e70ec1f5386878c93e76f:disqus , I think Jesus might have agreed with her about whether or not he was (a) God.  :-)

    @Sabio:disqus , presumably you don’t object to kids learning Greek and Roman myths. The problem is with their being told – usually at a slightly older age – that unlike all other stories of the fantastic, these ones are factual. Of course, some of the “best Biblical children’s stories? are in fact R-rated stories for adults that have been turned into stories for children precisely by the paring away of the sex, murder, gore and intrigue. But when they get older, the Brick Testament will fill them in on those details…

  • Hjalti

    Right, and that’s probably one of the few things she and Jesus would agree on ;)

  • Hjalti

    Right, and that’s probably one of the few things she and Jesus would agree on ;)

  • http://triangulations.wordpress.com/ Sabio Lantz

    @ James
    (1) How did you put that little box around our names?

    (2) Sure, I read my kids myths from lots of places [Hebrew,Greek,Hindu,Chinese, Buddhist and even NT] — they may even know the Bible a little better than some of their friends.
    But I don’t tell them over and over — heck, there is so much fiction out there — modern and ancient.  I don’t make them “learn” them either — just exposure.

    (3) But the most important point I wanted to make was to expose the common assumption that reading the Bible [or any other holy book] to your kid teaches them morals.  Or bigger yet, that religion teaches morals.  We have lots of evidence showing immoral acts equal between religious and non-religious populations, don’t we?

  • http://triangulations.wordpress.com/ Sabio Lantz

    @ James
    (1) How did you put that little box around our names?

    (2) Sure, I read my kids myths from lots of places [Hebrew,Greek,Hindu,Chinese, Buddhist and even NT] — they may even know the Bible a little better than some of their friends.
    But I don’t tell them over and over — heck, there is so much fiction out there — modern and ancient.  I don’t make them “learn” them either — just exposure.

    (3) But the most important point I wanted to make was to expose the common assumption that reading the Bible [or any other holy book] to your kid teaches them morals.  Or bigger yet, that religion teaches morals.  We have lots of evidence showing immoral acts equal between religious and non-religious populations, don’t we?

  • http://www.patheos.com/community/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

    @Sabio, when you use Disqus with Internet Explorer, it seems to turn the @ plus name into a specific reference, sort of like Facebook does.

    I hope that my recent posts on the stories of Noah and Abraham make clear that I don’t think that telling religious stories necessarily teaches morality, and sometimes quite the contrary! :-)

  • http://www.patheos.com/community/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

    @Sabio, when you use Disqus with Internet Explorer, it seems to turn the @ plus name into a specific reference, sort of like Facebook does.

    I hope that my recent posts on the stories of Noah and Abraham make clear that I don’t think that telling religious stories necessarily teaches morality, and sometimes quite the contrary! :-)

  • Pingback: doudoune moncler

  • Pingback: http://www.anne-lamort.com/wp-content/cache/


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X