Talpiot Tomb Latest

The Talpiot Tomb seems to surge in and out of public attention, and thus also in and out of focus in the biblioblogosphere, on the blogs of academics who focus on Biblical studies, archaeology, and other related fields. What led it to become a focus again was the report that renowned scholar Emile Puech had agreed with the identification of the name “Jonah” on one of the ossuaries.

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It turns out, as Jim West reported, sharing an e-mail from Puech, that he feels that he was misled by Simcha Jacobovici, or rather by an associate of his who kept Jacobovici’s involvement a secret.

The plot has thickened as Mark Goodacre presented evidence that there are two “replicas” of the ossuary in question, with significant differences in what is on them.

There have been a number of satirical responses, including one by Bob Cargill that includes a serious illustration of Jacobovici’s lack of concern for fact-checking – not to mention his lack of relevant linguistic skills to be making the sorts of claims that he is. Jack Collins’ suggested alternative to reading “Jonah” also deserves mention, even if offered tongue-in-cheek. See also Dan McClellan’s post on “the” Cannes Film Festival, and a recent claim about a Talpiot tomb documentary winning an award.

And unsurprisingly the criticisms offered by scholarly bloggers have provoked a response from Jacobovich.

  • x x

    To think that James Tabor used to be a serious archaeologist.

  • Eliyahu Konn

    To think that anyone that holds to stories that violate physics can be academically employed.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

      Sorry, who was this comment directed at? I assume it wasn’t me (unless you were referring to the fact that I enjoy Star Trek even though neither the transporter nor warp drive is likely to pan out) but it isn’t clear which of the people mentioned in the post it could apply to, either.

      • Eliyahu Konn

        The world has it’s physical rules. To pander stories that violate those physical rules continues to this day.

        It is why the inscriptions and ossuaries found in 1980 in Talpiot are in the sights of academics whose livelihood depends upon a tale of a man that surely didn’t exist in the 1st century CE. This feud within Christian academics is not about that second tomb. Tabor and Jacobovici haven’t figured that out yet because they haven’t figured out yet what they have in the first tomb. Maybe Tabor has and would have to get employed in a Jewish school.

        The inscription was of a man named Yshua/Yehoshua and his bones were there along with names existing in history as his family. No Christian story there at all. Ossuary, names, bones, all solid physical evidence. Nothing supernatural. Everything according to how recorded history tells us of life and death.

        What does a Christian academic or Jewish academic do when the jig is up on the fables?

        • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

          I take it you have little or no idea of what goes on in secular and also most liberal religious institutions of higher education. Or what James Tabor thinks, for that matter. But you are also changing your focus. You talked about stories which violate physics, and if that was a reference to miracle stories, then you will find that historians and scholars – except for in conservative religious institutions – treat them with the skepticism they deserve. But now you are including dismissal of a historical figure that historians consistently conclude existed in the first century.

          What is this song and dance routine of yours really about? Do you actually have a point, and if so, is there some reason for not actually making it, and making it clearly?

          • Eliyahu Konn

            But I didn’t dismiss the historical figure.

            “The inscription was of a man named Yshua/Yehoshua and his bones were there along with names existing in history as his family. No Christian story there at all. Ossuary, names, bones, all solid physical evidence. Nothing supernatural. Everything according to how recorded history tells us of life and death.”

            • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

              That was what it sounded like when you wrote “a tale of a man that surely didn’t exist in the 1st century CE.” Perhaps you meant that the historical figure is not the supernatural one in the tale? But that isn’t what you wrote. And I confess that your point has been obscure – perhaps you are starting with certain assumptions, conversations you’ve been having elsewhere, already in mind, and may not realize that readers here are not assuming that prior conversation?

              • Eliyahu Konn

                “Perhaps you meant that the historical figure is not the supernatural one in the tale?”
                That was my song and dance routine.
                And this back and forth crap about a fish or a vase is a cover/response to the real evidence from 1980, not that Tabor and Jacobovici didn’t ask for it with some of the statements they make.


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