How dream sharing can be like the movie “Airplane”

 

In a real sense all life is interrelated. All men are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of reality.

~Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In the slapstick comedy Airplane, with Leslie Neilson, passengers invent unique ways to kill themselves when forced to sit next to one of the two romantic leads who tell, ad nauseam, their self-involved epic tale. With this in mind, do your best to err on the side of brevity in sharing your dreams. In other words, “A synopsis is bliss!”

Dream recall connects the dreamer to the multi-dimensionality of the dreaming mind. As a byproduct of this “far out” place where we go when we discuss our dreams we can sometimes lose all sense of time (I’m speaking from experience, being on both sides of the equation). In other words, even the most considerate dream reporter can literally prattle on for a half-hour while thinking they are sharing a brief 30-second synopsis. Meanwhile the people on the receiving end of the dream saga struggle to maintain keeping their eyes open and/or from strangling the dream reporter.

No doubt you’re familiar with REM. I’m not referring to the 80’s rock band, but the rapid eye movement phase of sleep when dreams are the most vivid (in most adults it occupies approximately 20–25% of total sleep.) Inspired by REM I’ve created RDM, which stands for Rapid Dream Movement. RDM is a way of sharing and receiving dream insight in a relatively expeditious manner. To practice RDM, with your dream buddy or in your dream mastermind, keep the following in mind:

  • Share One Dream at a Time:  Sometimes the telling of one dream leads to the memory of another, and another, and another…like an endless string of pearls. If you can recall more than one dream at a time, this is FANTASTIC! However, in order not to burn the person out on the receiving end of your dream report, check in with them to ensure they have the bandwidth to hear another dream.
  • Give It a Movie Title: Imagine your dream is a movie and ask yourself, “What is the title of this movie? And what’s the subtitle?” For example: The Misplaced Soliloquy—King Richard Won’t Wait; Barking Dog in the Backyard—Better Feed Him Quick. Don’t get too fancy with your dream titles. Go with the “first thought” method. The purpose of giving your dreams a title is that it makes the dream memorable, reference-able, and often gives you a bull’s eye-esque clue as to the dream’s message.
  • Just the Facts Ma’am: Share the play-by-play of the events of the dream (i.e. “The dog was hungry and barking for me to let him in. I locked the door and threw a steak out in the back yard. I was happy the dog was now contained within the safety of my backyard.”) Extreme dream details are why God created dream journals and Dream-Life Coaches. Think of your dream journal as the first and best place to track every minute dream detail, so that you can share the broad strokes for your dream buddy and/or Dream-Life Coach. 
  • Find the Feeling: Identify the feeling tone or emotion of the dream. In essence, the feeling or primary energy of the dream is like gold, in that it often contains the most primary aspect of the dream’s message.
  • Your Synopsis: Share your perspective on what you believe your dream is revealing to you. 

What’s a dream title of your most recent remembered dream? 

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Excerpted from It’s All In Your Dreams (Conari Press). Once you buy your copy, click here to receive $4,000 worth of fr*ee dreamy gifts throughout the month of May.

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Join the conversation! Post your dream on Dreams Cloud, then tweet it using #DreamChallenge.

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