#RacialJusticeEpiphany: The Lord Will Raise a Prophet

I spent a few days this week away from Durham in another Southern town, visiting with young people who’ve relocated to under-resourced neighborhoods there. They told me what they’ve learned about themselves and their home communities, living on the other side of the tracks. I listened to them struggle with what they’ve seen and heard—and [Read More...]

#RacialJusticeEpiphany: Radical Grace in a History of Race

Clarence Jordan, the Southern Baptist radical who started an inter-racial farming community in Southwest Georgia in 1942, used to tell a story about a time when he was invited to preach at a big, fancy church in the city. The pastor showed Jordan around his mid-20th century version of a mega church, celebrating the merits [Read More...]

#RacialJusticeEpiphany: Listening in the Dark

This weekend, 47 years after Martin King’s death, America will pause to remember his life and witness. At celebrations in churches, community centers and town squares across the country, many will wax eloquent, remembering Dr. King’s Dream.   Amidst the accolades, it’s also important to remember what people were saying about Dr. King 50 years ago. [Read More...]

#RacialJusticeEpiphany: Shine the Light on Inequality

Some years ago, when George W. Bush was president and some folks from Christian Peacemaker Teams were being held hostage in Iraq, Leah and I spent this first weekend of Epiphany across the street from the White House, keeping vigil and to “shine the light” on the Iraq War. January nights in DC are long [Read More...]

A Midnight Clear: Hope in America’s Present Darkeness

 For Christmas in 1849, when nearly four million people were enslaved in America, abolitionists introduced a new carol. “It Came Upon A Midnight Clear” celebrated the announcement of “peace on earth, good will to men” as more than a sentiment to warm people’s hearts. It was a proclamation that injustice could not last forever. In [Read More...]

No One Knows Enough

Since we opened a third home here at Rutba House(s) this summer, I’ve found myself praying morning prayer in three different places each week. The same old songs ring a bit differently in each place, inviting me to see what God is up to from a different vantage point. I’ve been praying with my eyes [Read More...]

Vote Your Dreams, Not Your Fears: #MoralWeekofAction Concludes in Raleigh

On the 51st anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Justice, the #MoralWeekofAction concluded yesterday with rallies and organizing meetings at 12 state capitals.  Though local print and TV media covered many of these events, Sarah Bufkin of the NC NAACP captured the spirit of the one I attended in Raleigh, NC. The [Read More...]

Sound the Shofar! Women Lead #MoralWeekofAction

In 14 state capitals across the US, faith and justice leaders are organizing a Moral Week of Action to conclude the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, in which he exhorted the crowd to “go home” to Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to work for justice. As a faith-rooted organizing effort, the [Read More...]

Give Us New Eyes

By Shane Claiborne It’s been said that our politics are often shaped by what we see out the window. Twenty years ago, if you’d asked me if I think police treat people fairly regardless of race, I would have said “Yes,” just like 70% of white folks in the recent Pew survey.  In fact, 30 [Read More...]

Don’t Let Anyone Look Down on Your Youth: #MoralWeekofAction Day 4

In 12 state capitals across the US, faith and justice leaders are organizing a Moral Week of Action to conclude the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, in which he exhorted the crowd to “go home” to Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to work for justice. Read news coverage of yesterday’s action [Read More...]


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