Be Visible

David Ker describes on his blog attempting to find someone online and not being able to, following up with encouragement to readers to make sure that, if someone is looking for them online, they can find them.

Curious, I typed in James F. McGrath on the Yahoo! search engine, and all but one of the results on the first page of hits was somehow connected with me.

Presumably search engines give an indication of either what is important about us, or “what the internet thinks” is typical of us.

And so I thought I’d share with you that this blog, Exploring Our Matrix, was the top hit. And the second result was a specific post on this blog. This one.

What do you think that says about me?  Is that my single most significant contribution to the World Wide Web?  :-)

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  • http://foolishsage.com Mark Traphagen

    I know more about Google than Yahoo, but I imagine Yahoo works similarly. Rankings (how high in the results a particular page appears) on a search engine are influenced by a number of factors. First and foremost are the number and quality of links to that page. By "quality" is meant the relative popularity of the sites or pages that link to yours. So more popular pages (and, to some extent, pages that also have some relevancy to your page) extend more weighty "votes" for your page than others.Beyond that, search engines use complex algorithms to calculate the relevancy of the page to the keyword (search term[s]) the person entered. The more relevant, the more "juice" your page gets for page rank for that keyword.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13140007604009678479 David Ker

    Even for those who aren't maniacal extroverts like ourselves, a few proactive steps can establish one's identity.If you search for just James McGrath the message is fuzzier. You are the top entry but it doesn't really say who you are.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02561146722461747647 James F. McGrath

    And someone not paying careful attention might get their hopes up that my new single will be out soon…

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12399706958844399216 terri

    What does it say when someone wants to be invisible on the web?I take great pride in my unsearchability on the internet! ;-)The only people who could find me are people who already know Where to look.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01111820035762957610 Geoff Carter

    As I am trying to sell myself and my archaeological research, I am pleased by my progress up the page in Google.As one of many Geoff Carters in the world, I am getting quite near the top, however, search Google for; Geoff + archaeology, and it makes me the top Geoff in archaeology worldwide, a reflection of my search-engine-optimised existence than any real status. [but it's a start]