Does Being Catholic Change How I Write About Pope Francis?

Does Being Catholic Change How I Write About Pope Francis? July 29, 2016

Benedict XVI, 2006 - by Giuseppe Ruggirello (Pope_Benedict_XVI_2006-01-20.jpg) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons
Benedict XVI, 2006 – by Giuseppe Ruggirello (Pope_Benedict_XVI_2006-01-20.jpg) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons
There’s no way for me to know until I do the writing, but let’s just say that I am deeply suspicious, as is Benedict XVI, of ‘the hermeneutics of rupture.’ In fact, three things happened in my secular academic life in 2014 that made me realize that there’s no sense in trying to separate spirituality and politics when writing about the Catholic Church, period, whether devotionally or analytically. Because I stopped seeing this rupture between devotion and analysis, I think it is also difficult for me to see how my chrismation a month ago ruptured anything.

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