bad samaritan

bad samaritan June 18, 2011


Buy the original.
Buy a print.

Great story.

Grace. Unending patience. Compassion. Taking care of expenses. Checking in. Disregarding one’s own safety for the sake of another.

It is so exhilarating to hear this story played out again and again… when it is played out.

If only this was what we were solely famous for.

If you haven’t bought my book of cartoons, you simply must. It addresses concerns such as this. Nakedpastor101: Cartoons by David Hayward“, from amazon.com, amazon.ca, amazon.de. Great for laughs and serious discussion!

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  • Isn’t that what He is soley famous for?

    Who are ‘We’, anyway?

    ‘We’…’He’…I’ll stick with ‘He’.

    We are a problem. He is the answer.

  • ann

    So true. Humanity seems to talk about peace and compassion. But practice abuse.

  • Ed

    I think the parable shows the difference between true Christianity and mere religion (as does the cartoon). If I see someone practicing ‘Bad Samaritinism’ I would conclude they are merely religious.

  • Jeff Sjolander

    If I hadn’t seen this behavior enough to choke a mule already it wouldn’t get to me as much as it does. Great one David!

  • Hmm, ‘In the precious name of boundaries, and by the blood of the lamb, I will not show self sacrificial love’! And everybody said …

    Last year I wrote an essay about the Dehumanising effects of Sexual Abuse. I used the story of The Good Samaritan, or I would prefer the story of the ‘Dehumanised Man’, as a basis for my essay. If anyone would like to have a read its on my website. http://www.turningthepage.herobo.com

  • Tiggy

    People say they don’t have time, but they have time to go to church and all those other church meetings and conventions.

  • tigg: yep.

  • There were two things that seriously disturbed me about Christians when I was a Christian. This was one of them.

  • Mary Ellen Mayo

    yeah, I just took another mental/emotional/spiritual 2 x 4 to the side of the head from some Southern Baptists on Facebook…between that and their support of politicians who are trying to kill everything keeping me out of the cemetery….in all honesty, I just feel like telling the whole bunch to go to hell. They accused another person of being an atheist. Don’t ever pour your hear out to them, because they’ll just pour salt into your wounds. I trust atheists because they’ve help keep me alive for most of the last 14 years. They’re good people. They don’t shoot their wounded like the church does.

  • ya TGM and Mary Ellen… sad.

  • Mary Ellen Mayo

    hear should be heart. And David, great cartoon. I’ll go back to Facebook and share it.

  • Ian

    It’s interesting to see how the Samaritan story is repackaged through the lens of christian orthodoxy. I don’t think Jesus was making a point about God’s love for humanity or God being the answer. It is an intensely human story with aid rendered by a human source who had compassion – the ability to empathise with another’s predicament.

    This is what I find so distasteful in religious belief – the answers to many of our common needs is simply to care for others rather than delegate that role to a divine source.

  • very good point Ian. and i agree.

  • @Mary Ellen Mayo,
    “I trust atheists because they’ve help keep me alive for most of the last 14 years. They’re good people. They don’t shoot their wounded like the church does.”
    Well, it’s refreshing to hear that not everybody sees us as a bunch of amoral baby eaters. 🙂
    http://www.zazzle.com/the_atheists_spoof_movie_poster_huge-228133014677851839

  • you eat babies?

  • “you eat babies?”
    Only if properly prepared.
    A little onion, potatoes, maybe some carrots…

  • so that would be the moral way

  • Oh no! Just the tasty way!

  • we better stop 😉

  • Does Christianity have a monopoly on contradictory behavior?

    If we Christians do hypocritical things, that goes against what Jesus teaches and we stand condemned. Of course, the question can then be asked: Are we supposed to rise to some ridiculous standard that requires we do everything for everyone? (I don’t see Jesus doing that.)

    By the way, did you ever notice that a materialistic worldview requires contradictory behavior?

    To believe with all your heart that everything in life is ultimately meaningless and purposeless, but to act like it does have both meaning and purpose is contradictory behavior. It contradicts both reality (in that worldview) and your own conscience.

    Can we see a materialist’s version of the same cartoon?

    Maybe I’ll draw that one…

  • @Joshua,
    “Does Christianity have a monopoly on contradictory behavior?”
    No, and nobody here makes that claim. So what is your point?
    “By the way, did you ever notice that a materialistic worldview requires contradictory behavior?”
    By materialistic, do you mean atheist? I want to make sure I have a clear understanding of what you mean before diving into this.

  • I see Joshua’s point though. Blogs like this one swarm with people who like to point out the faults of Christianity and church-goers. But there are two problems with it:

    1. Usually when Christianity is criticized, its with the attitude of “yes, I am better than them!”

    2. Other philosophies and religions are as bad or worse. No one calls them on the carpet though, like they do Christianity. For example, one of the cornerstones of Islam is charity. Applying the same criteria to them that we apply to Christianity, then there should be no poor people in the middle east. All the oil sheiks should have poured the oil wealth back onto their people, ending poverty and unemployment, etc etc. instead of buying yachts and skyscrapers. That is REAL charity in action. No one mentions that, though.

    Are Christians screwed up? Absolutely. Is everyone else screwed up too? Absolutely. That is one of the few constants in life: human beings are totally screwed up. Oh yeah…that book that everyone dismisses, you know, the Bible…it reveals and anticipates this behavior. By declaring that human beings are born with an innate bent toward acting antisocial and selfish, it predicts all the behaviors we keep ragging on about. Its expected. It is also a universal condition, without exemption, save one.

    I don’t mind that people criticize the church or Christianity. What I mind is criticism with the implication that any other ideology or philosophy is somehow better because Christianity can be criticized. On the contrary. Criticizing while believing superiority is philosophical bullying. I criticize the church myself, but with the aim of fixing it, not to make myself feel superior at someone else’s expense. Criticism is easy. Understanding that all human beings, including myself, are flawed and have nothing to brag about..that is hard.

  • OneTrueKinsman

    “Other philosophies and religions are as bad or worse. No one calls them on the carpet though, like they do Christianity.”

    No one is saying that the other religions/philosopies are not as bad, although I have never heard of a politician who follows Buddhist tradition trying to stop legalization of abortions, or an adherent of Jainism trying to stop same sex marriage. Christianity cries wolf, that they are the persecuted ones in the world, and that they are losing their rights (look at any fundamentalist in the U.S. for classic examples…Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin…) You want to know why Christianity is being attacked? Look at these three plus others in the limelight (Rand Paul, Michelle Bachmann) and you’ll know why.

    Islam has its own faults, as is apparent by the daily news items we see on Afghanistan, the suicide bombings, the mutilations of girls who just want an education…the list goes on. This religion also deserves criticism.

    My key point is this…religion should be a private affair for the adherent, regardless of which belief system it is. No one ever says “Don’t be a practicing Catholic/Mormon/Jain/Islamist/Hindu. The moment it enters the public sphere and pushes its own policies “’cause it knows better” on every man, woman, and child within a country, it opens itself up to every criticism it rightfully deserves. You want people to stop criticizing your Christianity? Stay out of my education, out of my bedroom, and out of my government’s policy making.

  • @OneTrueKinsman,
    Well said. Bravo!

  • Ed

    Wait a minute…what’s wrong with Christians trying to stop the legalization of abortion on demand and same sex marriages? The public law allows for people to lobby to change laws. The fact that primarily Christians are the ones trying to effect the change is moot. People in the US are allowed to be involved in the political process. It’s a right extended to, yep, even Christians.

  • @Ed,
    “Wait a minute…what’s wrong with Christians trying to stop the legalization of abortion on demand and same sex marriages?”
    I’m going to respond, but I know it’s pointless to expect you to fully understand or agree. Your comment reeks of ignorance on a (dare I say it?)…biblical scale.
    You should know damn well what’s wrong, Ed. What’s wrong is that there is a little something called the US Constitution and what you and others of your ilk are trying to do is circumvent the Constitution and force your religious beliefs on others in the United States. The Constitution wasn’t about protecting the majority, Ed. It’s about protecting the rights of the minority.
    “The public law”…wtf is that? Don’t bother to answer, that’s a rhetorical question. I guess I must have missed the seminar on “the public law”.
    You’ll respond with the usual canned fundamentalist idiocy that I’ve read and heard a thousand times already, so I’ll not even bother to respond to what you might have to say. What I’ve written is for the benefit of others who actually give a damn about personal freedoms and human rights.

  • Ed

    I’m not sure who you’re mad at, but it’s not me. I’m the Christian who gives money and time to end human slavery in the US and other Countries. I’ve spent more than 10 years working with homeless and getting free food to people who need it. I’ve worked for over 5 years helping senior citizens get public benefits. I personally supported a homeless mom and kids in my home until they found adequate safe housing. I have personally given money to help burn victims, children who lost parents in auto accidents, provided free funerals so indigent families can have respectful place to bury their dead. I have helped people with emotional needs find mental health help. I have helped addicts kick habits in my home. I have worked all my life and given much money to help people with their personal freedoms and human rights across all racial, social, religious and economic lines. It gives me tremendous personal satisfaction to do so. I’m also the member of a minority.

  • Matthew 6:5

  • Ed

    I’ve also traveled overseas to help people in 3rd world countries. I’ve given financial and emotional assistance to people dying of AIDS. I’ve personally taken homeless people for meals and sat with them to eat. If I support Christianity, it’s because God has been very good to me to allow me to help others in His name. I don’t apologize for loving God or others. It’s liberating!

  • Joshua

    @GLM

    Please look at the cartoon again.

    Please read my previous comment again.

    As for your position on personal freedom: You don’t mind people having it, you’re problem is when people exercise it to do what they think is right, right? But if they don’t help out other people, give to charities and the poor, then it’s OK to clap, hiss, and point and say, “Look at you, you hypocrite”? Can I be comfortable and use your words to tell you that “disturbs” me?

    @Jon

    You’re right on.

    @Ed

    I, for one, sincerely thank you.

    @OneTrueKinsman

    Have you ever thought that maybe the reason you’ve never seen Buddhist politicians doing things is due to: a) there are no genuine Buddhist politicians in America; 2) reality, in Buddhism, is something to be escaped from, not embraced and helped?

    You believe that “religion should be a private affair for the adherent, regardless of which belief system it is”, right? How ironic that you’d post a semi-public comment on the Internet telling people that their belief system should be a private affair. Why not keep your belief to yourself, how ’bout it? 😉

    The Buddhist country were I live had no hospitals, no schools for women, and no literacy until Christian missionaries arrived. But maybe those people should’ve kept their beliefs to themselves…

  • @Joshua,
    It’s TGM, not GLM.
    Anyway…
    “As for your position on personal freedom: You don’t mind people having it, you’re problem is when people exercise it to do what they think is right, right?
    No, WRONG. Read what I wrote. I have a problem with idiots who try to usurp the Constitution of the United States of America. Forcing your religious beliefs on others is illegal. No matter how much that may piss you off, it’s illegal.
    “But if they don’t help out other people, give to charities and the poor, then it’s OK to clap, hiss, and point and say, “Look at you, you hypocrite”?”
    I have NO idea what you are referring to. I never wrote that.
    In regards to your comment to OneTrueKinsman,
    “You believe that “religion should be a private affair for the adherent, regardless of which belief system it is”, right? How ironic that you’d post a semi-public comment on the Internet telling people that their belief system should be a private affair. Why not keep your belief to yourself, how ’bout it?”
    There’s nothing ironic about it at all. You just don’t know what you are writing about. Atheism isn’t about beliefs. It’s about LACK of belief. Keep YOUR beliefs out of our government.
    Then there’s this little gem:
    “The Buddhist country were I live had no hospitals, no schools for women, and no literacy until Christian missionaries arrived. But maybe those people should’ve kept their beliefs to themselves…”
    Are you seriously implying that it was necessary to push religion on others in order to bring them hospitals & schools?

  • Crystal

    I once heard a fellow Christian say that only Christians do selfless good things for others. The rest do good things so they can get something back for themselves. LOAD OF CRAP!

    Christian love done right is a beautiful thing. The world could do with more of it. Done badly, and blowing one’s own trumpet whilst doing it is ugly.

  • Ed

    Joshua, I wanted to send you personal greetings and blessings. I appreciate your comments. I suspect you are someone who cares for others genuinely and truely and for the joy of serving our Lord.

    I have to say that many of the posts throughout this website make me very happy that I have a church where I can worship God and celebrate His endless love with people of like faith. The congregation in which I worship is like a safe harbor and I respectfully cherish their friendship and love. If what I have for my church life is more of an exception then it makes it all the more precious in my heart.

    Blessings to you, brother. As you well know, God is good and worthy of our praise.

  • OneTrueKinsman

    Joshua,

    If you had to choose between a ‘law of the land’ that is secular (no religious involvement) vs. one that is theocratic (medium to heavy religious influence) which would you choose?

    Now, let’s be specific about the theocratic law? What if that religion were Islam, specifically Sharia Law? You probably would not be a fan of this influence at all.

    This is my point. The secular option is best, simply because this option aims to find middle ground for ALL citizens, regardless of which way they lean religiously. Secularism doesn’t aim to eliminate religion or religious belief from individuals…it doesn’t care what you do behind closed doors.

    What secularism does is ensure that government policies are not influenced by religious special interest groups. The laws are ‘human’ laws, applied generally across the spectrum. What’s so wrong with that? Or is that a ‘belief’ system in your mind?

    I, as probably most other atheists, speak about fairness across the board, regardless of what belief a person holds. Yes, we will criticize religion, but what are we criticizing? Well, primarily, the supernatural component, since we ask for some type of evidence to prove that your claims of ‘god’ are true. But, we also criticize people who adhere to the dogma – of Christianity, of Islam, of Hindu tradition – when the actions are far removed from what the ‘policies’ of the respective texts dictate (e.g. love thy neighbor, but act badly to others, specifically non-Christians*), or when the ‘policies’ are adhered to VERY closely and make no sense in today’s day and age (e.g. homosexuality is a sin).

    *note: I pick on Christianity because it is most familiar to me, not because it’s easiest. Even Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, etc. have their faults.

  • Ed

    Thanks for sharing, One True Kinsman. You have well articulated the crux of the secular/Christian battlefield as it relates to politcs and it gives me much food for thought.

  • Christine

    Hi Ed,

    I thought I might throw my opinion in as well, so as to contribute a slightly different viewpoint: I am a Christian. And on this one, I’m totally with OneTrueKinsman.

    I appreciate that you’ve done a lot of good. I don’t think anyone was trying to say otherwise.

    But human rights, strictly speaking, have two key characteristics. They are: 1. something all people are entitled to equally by virtue of their birth and 2. something that government are required to protect for all their citizens (and, theoretically, for people elsewhere, but that’s another conversation).

    No matter was good your doing, to say that that is betowing “personal freedoms” and “human rights” upon people is not accurate. Such rights and freedoms and things granted and enforced by law.

    So, while all the things you described above are admirable, it doesn’t exempt you from respecting the rights and freedoms of others – of acknowledging that other are entitled to the same rights and freedoms as yourself.

    You may have the legal right to lobby for whatever laws you wish – but what you lobby for could still be against the constitution (separation of church and state, freedom of religion, etc.). It would be illegal, contrary to people’s basic human rights, for the government to adopt, or maintain, what you are asking for.

    The other question is whether such lobbying is moral. Even if you are legally allowed, is it the chariable thing to do to try to prevent others from having their rights recognized to try to deprive them of rights?

    And, ultimately, if people only do they “right thing” as defined by you) because the government made them, is that really the type of democracy we want? Or do we want the laws only to protect people and allow a place for personal choice – so that morality actually means something?

    Something more to reflect on, perhaps.