Religious Risk

Religious Risk February 22, 2015

Religion RISK

Pliny the In-Between re-envisages religion in terms of the board game RISK. Or is it that he re-envisages the board game RISK in terms of religion?

Either way, the combination is thought-provoking. To what extent do various people and groups view religion as a game of world conquest and domination?

"On gender and the übermensch:1) As far as I know, Nietzsche never gives any real ..."

ReligionProf Podcast Special: Batman in Bowling ..."
"If my perspectives on conservatives are anecdotal straw men, surely it would help persuade me ..."

Easter and Historical Nuance
"again, i am a product of the 'hallowed' halls of liberal arts academia. i have ..."

Easter and Historical Nuance

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Progressive Christian
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • mechanar

    wow after looking at that site were this catoon is from I can only say one thing. Thats the most unfunny most intellectual offensive crap that I have ever seen.

  • John MacDonald

    That’s the sense I get from the gospel of Matthew:

    Matthew 28:16-20 New International Version (NIV)

    The Great Commission

    16 Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. 17 When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. 18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

  • John MacDonald

    CONQUERING THE EARTH WITH THE GOSPEL IN THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES:
    *******Sending Out Emissaries (Deuteronomy 1:1-46; Luke 10:1-3, 17-30):

    Robert M. Price points out that just as Moses had chosen twelve spies to reconnoiter the land which stretched “before your face,” sending them through the cities of the land of Canaan, so does Jesus send a second group, after the twelve, a group of seventy, whose number symbolizes the nations of the earth who are to be conquered, so to speak, with the gospel in the Acts of the Apostles. He sends them out “before his face” to every city he plans to visit (in Canaan, too, obviously).

    To match the image of the spies returning with samples of the fruit of the land (Deuteronomy 1:25), Luke has placed here the Q saying (Luke 10:2//Matthew 9:37-38), “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few; therefore beg the Lord of the harvest to send out more workers into his harvest.”

    And Jesus’ emissaries return with a glowing report, just as Moses’ did.