You’re not BORED, are you?

You’re not BORED, are you? June 4, 2014

I’ve seen this picture here and there online, and I like it. I like it a lot. 

 

Of course, this would only work with kids who can read. Or, let’s face it, this would only work with kids who are not actively campaigning to drive you out of your gourd.  But it should work. It’s a good idea in theory, and some days, that is the best you can get.

However, it needs expanding. For instance, here is a version for my two-year-old (who, admittedly, has never been bored in her life):

Here is one for the dog:

And here is one for my husband:

 

 

Well, that should keep ’em busy.


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  • MichaelP71

    Wait…conspicuous by its absence is your list…hmmm…interesting.

  • Laura Rydberg

    So we’re not the only one who calls it boinking then…

  • This is as good as the whole ‘remove a letter from a movie title’ thing. It needs to be generalized: Here’s one for the Evil League of Evil:

  • anna lisa

    Hahahahahah. It can’t *ever* be boring at your house, if you see life through that lens.

  • MightyMighty1

    Yes, where is Simcha’s List, I doth wonder?

    • simchafisher

      I assumed everybody was already pretty clear on how I spend my time.

      • MightyMighty1

        B:abies
        O:vulating
        R:eproducing
        E:strogen
        N:apro Technology

        Or

        B:oinking (I had to look that up)
        O:rdering gin through the liquor store’s drive-thru window
        R:eading Something Other Than God
        E:ating Dr. Who-themed foods
        D:readmilling

        amirite?

  • mel

    ummm,,,whats the *YARR mean(will I regret asking?) 🙂

    • donttouchme

      “According to the Dictionary of English Nautical Language Database, “yare,” also pronounced “yahr” and derived from the Old High German word, “garo,” meaning “ready,” refers to a well-designed, easy-to-handle boat. “Yar” is also connected to the Gaelic word, “garbh,” meaning “rugged,” which accounts for the naming of the River Yar on the Isle of Wight.”

      • simchafisher

        Oh, now you’re overthinking it. “Yarr” is just my standard “crestfallen pirate” comment, and it can mean any number of things; hence the asterisk.

  • Patty

    Hysterical!!! I love the one for the little kids, almost choked on my Cheeto’s 🙂

  • Philothea

    OHMYGOODNESS…. *dies at “offered your gentlemanly services to anyone’s leg”*. Hilarious. I’m so not a dog person.

  • ThereseZ

    Well, thank the saints and angels that the dog’s “D” (dragged your hairy rear…) is also not your husband’s “D.”