Products We Love: Greek Yogurt and new dual-action Lysol cleaning wipes

Let's Get it Started

Greek Yogurt, where have you been all my life? With the high energy/protein requirements of daily life these days, beginning the day with toast, cereal, or any of the usual quick breakfast options leaves me faint on the couch by 10am. Eggs are a little high maintenance and aren’t all that appetizing 7 mornings a week, and before now, yogurt didn’t quite have the protein to satisfy me. Enter nonfat Greek yogurt: one individual-sized pot has 14g of protein (the same amount of protein as two and a half eggs, and twice the protein of a normal pot of yogurt), only 130 calories, and 40% of the calcium RDA, just for starters. That is packing a serious nutritional punch. My sisters-in-law were eating it with honey and slivered almonds mixed in when we saw them at Christmas. My kids love it, and it’s quick before school and so healthy. It’s about 1.5 times as expensive as normal yogurt, but less with sales and coupons, and now all the store generic brands are making their own Greek yogurt. Bring on the day!

Who needs a cleaning lady, anyway?

Have you seen the new dual-action Lysol wipes? I have always been a fan of Lysol/Clorox wipes for quick cleanup, because they are durable, quick, and lighter on the chemicals than spray plus paper towel. Now, some mastermind at Lysol Headquarters has taken it to a new level. The new dual-action wipes have one side that is the usual softer side for wiping, but now the other side has a scouring texture for scrubbing. With that scrubbing side added, I can deep clean a large-ish surface in our house with one wipe in no time flat. Cleaning the gooey cup holders and other heavily-soiled surfaces inside the car? A breeze. Scrub then wipe then toss it out. Thank you, Lysol, for eliminating a few extra steps and making quick cleanups even quicker.

  • AWOL Mommy

    talk to me about the fat content on the yogurt.

    • http://buildingcathedrals.com Kat

      You can get regular, 1%, or fat free, and they all taste great. My favorite brands are Fage and Chobani. The knock-offs are cheaper, but don’t taste good at all – pay a couple of extra bucks for the real thing! I get the plain flavor and add honey or agave nectar on top of mine, that way I can control the amount of sugar. I also add ground flax seed or wheat germ for some added health benefits.u00a0nOne more thing: Great substitute for sour cream in many different recipes, and for mayo, you can substitute for 50% of the amount.u00a0n

      • Texas Mommy

        Great cooking tips, Kat!

      • Mary Alice

        I put out greek yogurt (Fage) in place of sour cream on our family quesadilla nights — if some of my children choose mostly yogurt, I still feel like they have had good nutrition.nnI also throw some on a baked sweet potato for a sour cream flavor, because I dislike the texture of low fat or fat free sour cream, whereas Fage 0% still has a great texture

  • Anonymous

    Is Greek Yogurt naturally low-fat?u00a0 I only ask because anything low-fat (with the fat removed) isn’t good for you.u00a0 You are much better off eating the real deal.u00a0 nnI’m not a yogurt person AT ALL, but perhaps my children would like a full-fat version of Greek Yogurt for breakfast.

    • Texas Mommy

      I fall in line with Red/Nourishing Traditions as far as low-fat products, esp. dairy. Greek yougart by definition is not naturally low-fat, just strained, but most of the products marketed here are low-fat. I think Fage makes a “classic” plain kind that is full fat.u00a0nnI usually add some granola and/or toasted almonds and a little agave nectar to ours.u00a0

    • Juris Mater

      The nonfat version uses skim milk. Is that bad? Could you elaborate on this full-fat dairy deal?nnSo what do Nourishing Traditions disciples eat for breakfast?u00a0

      • Caro

        I’m with Red and Nourishing on dairy fat. Apparently, eating artificially low fat and fat-free foods can mess with your hormones and is linked to infertility and other hormonal issues. Marilyn Shannon discusses this in “Fertility, Cycles, and Nutrition.” If I remember right, Red’s discussed this in a post quite a while (year or two) back.

      • Anonymous

        Nourishing Traditions is in favor of full-fat dairy products.u00a0 Most low-fat or non-fat dairy products are heavily processed and altered to remove the fat.u00a0 Naturally occurring fat is very good for our bodies, improves brain function (especially in developing children), and is good for our hormones.u00a0 There have been a number of recent studies lately confirming this information.u00a0 Low-fat dairy products result in more sugar (to improve taste), AND cause sugar cravings.u00a0 Their texture is off for a reason–it’s fake food.nnI don’t want to scream it, but low fat isn’t good for you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!u00a0 Whether it be yogurt or sour cream or greek yogurt or cheese, purchase the full fat version.u00a0 Added sugar is a much bigger problem for your health.u00a0 Natural fat is not he enemy.u00a0 nnWhen eating a natural diet, try to remember two things 1) eat foods with real ingredients 2) limit sugar 3) allow yourself plenty of natural fats.u00a0 nnAnd as an aside, I’m going to try out some full-fat Greek Yogurt (if I can find it, it’s hard to find full-fat versions of yogurt in the stores).u00a0 It is a great suggestion.u00a0 I think with some granola it will be an excellent breakfast option for me and my kids.u00a0

        • Texas Mommy

          I just wanted to add that high cholesterol levels, especially the dangerous triglycerides, do not come mostly from saturated animal fat, but from the body converting excess sugars into triglycerides. It is the processed/refined foods that are mainly to blame for high cholesterol rather than natural fats. There is a cultural disdain/fear of natural full fat products that I think is totally unjustified.nnRed, do you think they recommend children switch to lowfat milk for obesity reasons? B/c it seems to me that doing so just promotes the sugar dependence younger and creates more long term obesity. I always get a kind of horrified look from the nurse at my ped when I tell her that we drink only whole milk…

          • Lisa

            Hey ladies!u00a0 Thanks for expounding a bit on this.u00a0 From what I (quickly!) skimmed about Nourishing Traditions, it seems it’s similar to some of the principles put forth by Atkins??u00a0 I glanced at amazon.com, and realized the book is a whopping 600+ pages.u00a0 Any suggestions on how to get a decent, brief overview of the principles?u00a0 I’d like to read more — but I don’t see finding time to read that book in the near future.

          • Texas mommy

            The only thing I know about Atkins is no/low carbs, though I could be wrong, which is not what Nourishing Traditions promotes. Whole unrefined grains are an important part of any diet! A lot of the book is comprised of recipies, so it’s not 600 pages of text, bur each chapter has a summary of health benefits for particular group.

          • Jurismater

            Thanks ladies! We all prefer whole milk products, especially my husband, so this gives us the go-ahead!!

          • Anonymous

            Tex, nnTotally agree on the cholesterol level analysis.u00a0 nnI honestly have never heard of a recommendation that children drink low fat dairy products.u00a0 My pediatrician recommends that the children drink whole milk, as he says it is good for their brain development and children really need a high amount of natural fat in their diet.u00a0 I’ve never heard of the low-fat recommendation for young children.u00a0 And I agree with you that the research seems to suggest that low-fat diets would actually increase sugar cravings, and cause more long term weight problems.u00a0

          • Texas Mommy

            The AAP recommend switching to 2% at age 2.nn”The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that parents begin low fat milk after age two years. Before that age, toddlers should be either breastfeeding or drinking whole milk, but after age two you can start giving him 2%, 1%, or skim milk. And of course they should be either breastfeeding or drinking an iron fortified infant formula before age 12 months.nnWhy switch to low fat milk?Mostly because your child will likely be getting plenty of fat from other things that he is eating. And starting early can help to develop preferences for low fat foods that he will hopefully keep for a lifetime of healthy eating.”

          • Texas Mommy

            The AAP recommends switching to 2% milk at the age of 2.u00a0the American Academy of Pediatrics advises that parents begin low fat milk after age two years. Before that age, toddlers should be either breastfeeding or drinking whole milk, but after age two you can start giving him 2%, 1%, or skim milk. And of course they should be either breastfeeding or drinking an iron fortified infant formula before age 12 months.Why switch to low fat milk?Mostly because your child will likely be getting plenty of fat from other things that he is eating. And starting early can help to develop preferences for low fat foods that he will hopefully keep for a lifetime of healthy eating.

          • Anonymous

            I just wanted to add that I didn’t always think this way! I avoided fat like the plague and was a vegetarian for years! So if this seems overwhelming to anyone, I can totally understand. I recommend doing some research and start making small switches for your family towards more natural foods!


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X