Struggling to “Speak the Truth in Love” in Election Season: Pluralistic Ethics & Political Polarization

Over the past few decades, many studies have shown a growing political polarization in our country. This widening gap between the right and the left has made finding a middle ground increasingly difficult. So in this presidential election season in which our collective awareness of political polarization is heightened, I would like to reflect on negotiating between divergent perspectives.  There was, for example, a front page headline last week in my hometown paper that read, “Transgender teen s … [Read more...]

Evil: Bad Apples or Bad Barrels?

Historically, one of the weaknesses of liberal religious traditions has been a naïve optimism. In rejecting the extreme pessimism of many orthodox religious traditions (a belief in “Original Sin,” the “total depravity” of human beings, and the corrupt nature of the world and society), many progressives  overestimated the perfectibility of human nature, the possibility of building utopian societies, and the inevitability of progress “onward and upward forever.” Whereas many orthodox religious trad … [Read more...]

“Dispatches from the Front Lines of Climate Justice”

A few years ago, a park ranger was leading an environmental awareness tour for a group  that I was a part of that included a visit to the county landfill. The part of her talk I remember most vividly was that, “We are deceiving ourselves whenever we think we are throwing something away in the trash. There is no ‘away.’” We can try to throw something away from us into the trash can, but there are impacts on the environment from landfills and all the other ways we dispose of our waste. We are alway … [Read more...]

The Spirituality of Shakespeare

We do not know the exact date when William Shakespeare was born. Our first record is of his christening on April 26, 1564 at Stratford-on-Avon in England. There is a certain appealing symmetry in the speculation that he was born three days before his christening, which would mean that the day of his birth coincided with the day of his death, exactly 52 years later on April 23, 1616. This month we are approaching the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. And in our time, significant S … [Read more...]

Just Mercy: “Each of Us Is More Than the Worst Thing We’ve Ever Done”

Each year the Unitarian Universalist Association selects one book as a “Common Read” that all UUs are encouraged to study, discuss, and respond to. Previous Common Reads have included:The Death of Josseline: Immigration Stories from the Arizona-Mexico Borderlands Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Behind the Kitchen Door (justice for restaurant wor … [Read more...]

Remembering, Changing, Inventing: How Stories About Jesus Were Told

One of my favorite college classes was “Jesus and the Gospels.” Ironically, one of my strongest memories from the class was not a lesson the professor intended. During a series of presentations toward the end of the semester, one student—instead of following the assignment to use historical-critical research methods—used the opportunity to denounce everything we had learned that semester as heretical and concluded by quoting Hebrews 13:8, “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever. … [Read more...]


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