Voice of a Non-Dualist Christian Woman

I think I may have found an important feminine voice in the field of interfaith mysticism: Sara Grant, R.S.C.J. Look at this description of one of her books, from the University of Notre Dame Press Website:

Toward an Alternative Theology: Confessions of a Non-Dualist Christian
By Sara Grant, R.S.C.J. Introduction by Bradley J. Malkovsky

Toward an Alternative Theology: Confessions of a Non-Dualist Christian is the spiritual and intellectual autobiography of Sara Grant, a Roman Catholic Scottish nun, who, until her death in 2000, established herself as one of the leading twentieth-century figures in Indian Christian theology and the contemplative life. In this slim volume, Grant recounts her search not only for God, but for a right understanding of God, as well as for a way of rethinking Christian teachings on the mystery of God’s relation to the world that could overcome widespread popular dualisms. Appearing for the first time in the United States, this engrossing book eloquently shows how Christian theology and spirituality can be enriched by encountering the experiences and concepts of advaita. This updated edition includes a new introduction by Bradley J. Malkovsky, associate professor of comparative theology at the University of Notre Dame.

About the author: Sara Grant, R.S.C.J., was a member of the Jnana-Deepa-Vidyapeeth faculty in Pune, India and head of the Christa Prema Seva Ashram.

“This is a spiritual journey, reminding one of Augustine, Merton, or Hammarskjold . . . a perfect blend of spirituality, classical Christian and Hindu philosophy, and what contemporary theology could be.” —William Cenkner, Katharine Drexel Professor of Religion, The Catholic University of America

“Sara Grant bent her mind and heart to the theology of Sankara, whom she compares in an amazingly astute way to Thomas Aquinas in this book. Toward an Alternative Theology provides a readable and penetrating theological synthesis carried out in an interfaith atmosphere . . . It serves a great purpose to the community of philosophical theology.” —David Burrell, C.S.C., Theodore Hesburgh Professor in Philosophy and Theology, University of Notre Dame

Is anyone who is reading this blog familiar with Sara Grant? If so, please leave your comment here and/or get in touch with me via email. Thanks!

  • Raymond Munro

    I just came across your website today. I haven’t read Sara Grant’s book yet but I am now reading a book by Vandana Mataji R.S.C.J. called Nama Japa:Prayer of the Name in the Hindu and Christian traditions you might also find of great interest.


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