Speaking of Silence (On Internet Radio)

Rabbi Rami

Rabbi Rami

One of the great paradoxes of being a writer (and speaker) on contemplative spirituality is that I essentially use words to invite people into a wordless place. Ah, sweet irony.

And  while that is usually a matter of writing, I love to speak about silence as well. Today (September 18, 2013) I am going to be on Rabbi Rami Shapiro‘s How to be a Holy Rascal internet radio show. Hope you can tune in. The show will be broadcast live at 11 AM Central time (Noon Eastern time, 10 AM Mountain time, 9 AM Pacific time), and to hear it, just visit this link: www.unity.fm/program/howtobeaholyrascal and click on the “Listen Now” button. I know we will be talking about contemplation and mysticism, but I suspect we will also explore interspirituality and the thorny question of the relationship between religion and spirituality.

Since it will be a live broadcast, you can also call in if you have a question for Rabbi Rami or me. Call 888.55.UNITY (888-558-6489) any time while the show is on (11 AM – Noon Central time).

If you miss the live broadcast, a link to a recording of the show will be posted probably by tomorrow. Once I have that link, I’ll post it to my Twitter feed.

David Dault

David Dault

And speaking of recorded interviews, I invite you to take some time to listen to my two-part interview on David Dault‘s Things Not Seen Radio. This pre-recorded interview looks at contemplative spirituality primarily from a Christian perspective although we do discuss my interfaith wanderings as well. Here are links to the two parts of the interview:

So happy listening (and call in today, if you can!)

  • http://interfaithandspirituality.blogspot.com/ Gareth Young

    I have been meaning to comment on the “spirituality versus/and religion” points you have been raising, and the idea of spirituality without religion. This is incredibly complex stuff, and I fear it is a space in which it is really easy for folk to go astray without realizing it. Yes, spirituality without religion is possible, but to live in thius way requires a level of spiritual maturity that in my experience is hard to achieve without having had a serious communal spiritual practice, which I believe is hard to achieve without grounding in the forms, traditions, rituals and community strength of a religious practice. In other words, organized religion provides the starter-kit which enables one to graduate and move into more spirituality, less religion. I have been really experiencing this in an interesting way as I first observed Ramadan, and more recently the Jewish High Holy Days http://interfaithandspirituality.blogspot.com/.

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