A Prayer to St. Joseph the Worker

O Glorious St. Joseph, model of all those who are devoted to labor, obtain for me the grace to work conscientiously, putting the call of duty above my natural inclinations, to work with gratitude and joy, in a spirit of penance for the remission of my sins, considering it an honor to employ and develop by means of labor the gifts received from God, to work with order, peace, moderation and patience, without ever shrinking from weariness and difficulties, to work above all with purity of intention and detachment from self, having always death before my eyes and the account that I must render of time lost, of talents wasted, of good omitted, of vain complacency in success, so fatal to the work of God.

All for Jesus, all through Mary, all after thine example, O Patriarch, St. Joseph. Such shall be my watch-word in life and in death.

– Composed by St. Pius X

Comments

  1. Interesting how prayers can reflect the person creating the prayer. What are some of those attributes based on? How do we know that St. Joseph worked “in a spirit of penance for the remission of my sins”? Or “to work with order, peace, moderation and patience, without ever shrinking from weariness?” He may very well have done so, but isn’t that speculation?

    The word that really caught my attention was “moderation.” How do we know that St. Joseph was moderate, and moderate at what?

    I’ve envisioned St. Joseph to be a very conservative fellow, orthodox in religion, self-sufficient, charitable, and disciplined, all in a very human way where he may have experienced weariness. But that’s from my imaginative rendering of his character.

  2. Notgiven says:

    Here’s another great pic by a former classmate of mine:
    http://corbertgauthier.net/gallery%20I_02.html

  3. Barbara P says:

    Manny he was also a man willing to take risks for God and his family. He didn’t let orthodoxy get in the way of answering God’s call to become Mary’s husband. He was also a righteous man so he was not going to subject Mary to death by stoning even before he knew of God’s plan. So I think we can surmise he wasn’t so rigid in his orthodoxy that he was unable to understand that sometimes one needs to look beyond a strict application of law and be open to seeing things from a different perspective

  4. “He didn’t let orthodoxy get in the way of answering God’s call to become Mary’s husband.”

    If I remember the Gospel of Matthew correctly Barbara, he was ready to dump his fiance when he was under the impression she was pregnant and not by him. It took an angel in a dream to convince him to go against his orthodoxy.

  5. This is not an attempt to diminish the importance of the feast of St. Joseph the Worker:

    Today is the 79th anniversary of the founding of the Catholic Worker. When I get depressed about the state of the Church today, I just recall the legacy of Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin.

  6. Barbara P says:

    No he was going to end the betrothal quietly without subjecting her to the penalty of stoning that was dictated by the law.

  7. Yes, I didn’t mean to imply he was going to let her get stoned. But he was going to “dump” her for an apparent sin.

    Oh Babara, I enjoy our exchanges. :)

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