Nine Years After 9/11 – A Choice Between Hate and Love

“The anniversary of 9/11 would be sufficient reason for reflection; in my faith tradition we live by a liturgical calendar on which we mark feast days and remembrances of those who have come before and shaped the way we live and believe. But with all these political and geo-political events (and others) that seem to be linked to 9/11 in the news, it’s an especially meaningful anniversary, and a time to consider the political and spiritual arenas and see what we might learn.” Episcopal lay minister Greg Garrett offers this thoughtful reflection as we approach the anniversary of 9/11. [Read more...]

Sharing Favorite Scriptures, Interfaith-Style

One of our group bloggers, Jason Derr, recently emailed me a news release about the launch of an interfaith partnership for action and justice work called FaithsUnited. I was so moved by the initiative, and especially by the opening program called the Scripture Exchange Program, I thought it worth sharing here. [Read more...]

Tony, Tony, Turn Around: Reflections on Luke 5:1-10

Chapter fifteen is the heart of Luke’s Gospel. With its three parables of Lost and Found, sheep, coin, and sons in which Jesus uses images for God that are offensive: a shepherd, a woman and a Father who has no pride. Several of Luke’s parables emphasize repentance as a dramatic redirection of a main character’s mind and purpose: The Prodigal Son, The Rich Fool, the Rich man and Lazarus. This parable on the other hand… well, how does a lost coin or a lost sheep repent? [Read more...]

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When Rockstars Deny the Foundation of Religion

To David, there is power in the uknowning. In the unraveling. In the dismantling journey towards unbelief. Where unbelief is true belief. David takes it too far. By focusing outside the temple and outside of the mountain, the very foundation of the temple, David is basically condemning these things as useless. Much like Jesus did when he spoke to the institutional representatives and told them they were dead inside. David is challenging us to see that the foundation of the institutions are the issue. [Read more...]

CS Lewis and Big Tent Christianity: Church and Faith Formation as Intentional Community

Modern Christianity was a faith marked as much by conflict and issues of control/dominance as it was of revolution and reformation. While early Christianity was not with out its own issues it was dominated, mainly, by monolithic structures in it’s regional Catholic or Orthodox forms. Reformation Christianity was represented by argument and doctrinal dispute and [Read More...]

Inner Monks Unite: A Monk Manifesto

All of you “inner monks” dressed in Protestant clothing, here’s an invitation for you. One of my favorite bloggers and spiritual directors, Christine Valters Paintner, has posted a “Monk Manifesto” at her site, Abbey of the Arts. I share her invitation with those of you seeking an intentional way of living contemplatively in the world. She’s also offering a free e-course called Monk in the World. [Read more...]

Why Big Tent Christianity?

“Brian McLaren and I are organizing a major public conference on September 8-9 in Raleigh, North Carolina in order to make the call for a return to “Big Tent Christianity” (seeBigTentChristianity.com). Why is this call important?” Theology Professor Philip Clayton offers a background and vision for this new movement. [Read more...]

Pakistan, Denying Them Answers, Job & God Overwhelmed

Pakistan is still reeling from the destruction of the floods. I have personal friends who are struggling through and offering their presence to these families. I think that’s the key, not offering them answers; answers can be destructive. Peace isn’t finding an answer to your problem, its knowing that you’re not alone. [Read more...]

Backward or Forward with God: A Response to Glenn Beck’s “Recovering Honor”

“Faithfulness to God today involves world loyalty and the willingness to sacrifice for the well-being of vulnerable persons and an equally vulnerable planet. Individual initiative, creativity, and freedom are important and essential to the good life, but they always exist in the context of caring for God by supporting the least of these and seeking to be God’s partners in healing the earth, economically, politically, and spiritually. The only gospel worth following is social, despite Beck’s revisionism: “let justice roll down like waters, righteousness like an everflowing stream.” (Amos 5:24)” Bruce Epperly on a different kind of Christian honor. [Read more...]

Counting the Cost: Lectionary Reflections on Luke 14:25-33

Says biblical scholar Earl Ellis, “Jesus’ purpose in telling these 2 parables is not to dissuade prospective disciples, but to awaken half hearted followers to the disastrous consequences of such a path”(195). They will be thrown out like worthless salt (Luke 14:18). [Read more...]

Religion, Politics and the Public Square

“I find good people of faith and conscience are reticent to speak up about controversial issues, whether in houses of worship or councils of government, because of the common misconception that expressing passionate views grounded in a religious or ethical belief system somehow violates the separation of religion and state.” Presbyterian minister and Director of the Marin Interfaith Council Carol Hovis appeals to people of faith to stand with Muslim Americans at this critical moment for all religions. [Read more...]

Ungrounding Ourselves into the Christ-Ethic

For Lacan, public law such as “No Photos” or “Do not go on the grass” implicitly attracts the subject of that law to commit the very thing it prohibits (exactly in the way that if we tell the child not to eat the freshly baked cakes, we are simultaneously pointing out the method with which [Read More...]


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