Adam (son of Saul) Bellow has written a book in praise of nepotism. Well, du-uh. Read more

Dale C. Allison, Jr., The New Moses: A Matthean Typology (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993). Dale Allison, a research fellow at the Friends University in Wichita, Kansas, has written a superb case study in the New Testament’s use of the Old. Though he focuses on only a single typology (Christ as a new Moses) in only a single gospel (Matthew), Allison’s book carries important implications for the study of the New Testament in general. He demonstrates that no one can hope to… Read more

Here is a very partial review/summary of a wonderfully stimulating book. I hope to go over it again sometime and add to this, but here it is in its unfinished form. Jeremy Begbie, Theology, Music and Time (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000). This is a book to savor. The basic theme is simple: Begbie, a musician and Vice Principal of Ridley Hall, Cambridge, serves up a theological meditation on time by employing categories drawn from… Read more

Richard A. Burridge, Four Gospels, One Jesus? (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994). Richard Burridge, dean of King’s College, London, has produced an insightful and very accessible introduction to the gospels. The book is straightforwardly organized: After an introduction that treats the various forms of modern New Testament criticism, he offers a substantial chapter on each gospel and concludes with a chapter arguing that while the four gospels present a diverse portrait of Jesus, they also set limits to our understanding of… Read more

I found several reviews (and partial reviews) of articles and books on my hard drive, and will post them here. Some of them were posted on a now-defunct web site, so this will make them available on the web, for those who know that this site exists! John Milbank, “The Soul of Reciprocity Part One: Reciprocity Refused,” Modern Theology 17:3 (July 2001): 334-391. Like everything that Milbank writes, this is a dense and difficult article. In essence, it is the… Read more

Teaching on Basil’s treatise On the Holy Spirit this year, I was impressed again with this wonderful treatise. Some quotations, from the St Vladimir’s edition: On the cosmic role of the Spirit: All things thirsting for holiness turn to Him; everything living in virtue never turns away from Him. He waters them with His life-giving breath and helps them reach their proper fulfillment. He perfects all other things, and Himself lacks nothing; He gives life to all things, and is… Read more

In 1 Samuel 12, Samuel gives his farewell speech to the people. He claims that he has not abused his position in any way, and asks the people to confirm this, citing Yahweh and “His anointed” as witnesses in his defense. Who is the “anointed”? Clearly, it is someone distinct from Yahweh, for Samuel is calling on a “double witness” to support his claim. Possibly Saul the Lord’s anointed, since he is already king. But how could Saul confirm Samuel’s… Read more

In 1 Samuel 12, Samuel gives his farewell speech to the people. He claims that he has not abused his position in any way, and asks the people to confirm this, citing Yahweh and “His anointed” as witnesses in his defense. Who is the “anointed”? Clearly, it is someone distinct from Yahweh, for Samuel is calling on a “double witness” to support his claim. Possibly Saul the Lord’s anointed, since he is already king. But how could Saul confirm Samuel’s… Read more

In 1 Samuel 12, Samuel gives his farewell speech to the people. He claims that he has not abused his position in any way, and asks the people to confirm this, citing Yahweh and “His anointed” as witnesses in his defense. Who is the “anointed”? Clearly, it is someone distinct from Yahweh, for Samuel is calling on a “double witness” to support his claim. Possibly Saul the Lord’s anointed, since he is already king. But how could Saul confirm Samuel’s… Read more

In 1 Samuel 12, Samuel gives his farewell speech to the people. He claims that he has not abused his position in any way, and asks the people to confirm this, citing Yahweh and “His anointed” as witnesses in his defense. Who is the “anointed”? Clearly, it is someone distinct from Yahweh, for Samuel is calling on a “double witness” to support his claim. Possibly Saul the Lord’s anointed, since he is already king. But how could Saul confirm Samuel’s… Read more

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