That Stupid Sarah Palin, Warning About Death Panels

What a maroon! Since when, in the past century, have we ever seen state bean counters kill innocent people in large numbers because they were deemed to be a costly burden on the efficient running of a gleaming modern state/corporate amalgamation?

  • Deacon Nathan Allen

    I like how the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence which came up with the “death pathways” goes by the acronym NICE, just like the evil corp. in C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength”. What’s a novelist to do anymore? You can’t make this stuff up.

    • ivan_the_mad

      Ha! You really can’t. That’s also the second reference to Lewis’ space trilogy I’ve seen in as many days (via this blog). Now I’m … doubly … as keen to reread the books!

  • Qualis Rex

    While I get the irony of your title, we must remember that Sarah Palin actually is very stupid; the proof being that she left the one true church for a Protestant/fundie sect and thus opening up the prospect of her soul being cast into eternal damnation. One simply has to look at her daughter, Bristol to see the fruit of Sarah’s decisions and verneer of her moral stance and family values peal in the light.

    With regard to the UK, as the token Euro on this thread I can say that it has definitely become a laughible basket-case and a wasteland of PC “values” (see: lack thereof). The result is if you don’t like English, you’re in luck because there won’t be any left in about 150 years, due to their negative birth-rates and mass immigration policies. I go to the UK for business at least twice a year, and each time I return it is more unrecognizable than when I lived there last decade, due to their commitment to diversity and the extreme effect of pop-culture on their youth. But most importantly, it is their utter disregard and in fact oppression of the Christian religion which is the death-knell for that society.

    • Dave G.

      That was sarcasm about Palin and her church, right?

      • Qualis Rex

        No. That post had less than a .04% sarcasm content.

  • Rick

    Gov. Palin is talking about the IPAB part of Obamacare. You would do well to read the act and understand it before you “run off at the mouth”.

    • Ted Seeber

      Yes, I live in the state where the representative that wrote IPAB comes from. We were also the first state in the union to somehow (don’t blame me, I don’t understand this either) decide that choking to death on 9 grams of poison is somehow more *dignified* than waiting for God to call you home under a morphine drip to kill pain (I really don’t understand that one AT ALL- if I’m going to abandon my faith and have a doctor assisted suicide, I think I’m going to look for a hospice center across the river in Vancouver where I can have a self-administered morphine IV- 9 grams of rat poison just doesn’t appeal to me at all!).

      What was the question again? Oh yeah, I don’t see any difference between a Government Bureaucrat forcing your doctor to have an IPAB talk with you and a free market insurance bureaucrat forcing your doctor to have an IPAB talk with you. Both are equally reprehensible, and suggest that human life is nothing in comparison to greed.

    • Andy

      Before the ACA we already had “each Panels” – they were the actuaries from the Insurance INdustry. As my mother was told – we won’t cover your breast cancer treatment because you are to old. IPAC nay not be any better, but all it does is replace one issue with another. The rather crazy belief that our business community can solve problems should have died out in 2008, and why it has not I have no idea.

      • http://chicagoboyz.net TMLutas

        As someone who just handled a quadruple bypass bill for a relative for cash (bridge loan) while she gets her finances in order, I can assure you that there’s a difference between the government and the private sector doing it. You can chunk down a mastercard and the problem of insurance goes away. Government restrictions tend to be stickier to get around as our Canadian friends have found out.

        As for the financial crisis of 2008, the horrible crisis that took place then was largely the result of a number of key government actions that made the normal free market feedback loops no longer work. First, the ratings firms have a legal oligopoly. Since the early/mid 1970s you can’t just make a competing agency. Then there was the requirement to lend money to people who couldn’t necessarily pay it back, which started in 1977 but really got enforcement teeth during the Clinton administration. Add in the obscene episode where the FDIC was providing deposit insurance for free for several years and you have a big chunk of the 2008 problem. But let’s not forget the government’s acceptance of too big to fail as not equaling insufficiently insured but rather that we must bail them out. And who can forget the Feds redefining bankruptcy so that privileged creditors were no longer guaranteed their place in line, but rather could be shoved back by politically connected interests.

        The idea that the 2008 fiscal crisis was a free market affair is fatally flawed.

        • Andy

          I could drop a credit card if I had one – however, what is the use of insurance if when needed you are denied because of age or cost. If you have a credit card or the wherewithall for one con grads, but it is that attitude that is destroying America – use credit.
          THe 2008 crisis – why did the agencies stop functioning – on their own – no – there was massive lobbying to remove the restrictions. The requirement to loan people money did not mean loaning people money beyond their means to pay it back. That shibboleth about loans should be forgotten.
          I agree that there is an oligopoly with the rating agencies – but why – I know money from outside.
          THe fiscal crisis of 2008 was not totally a free market affair and I never said it was. I said that the idea that the business community can solve problems should have died out. The business community in its current iteration is all about profit in the short term with little planning for the long term. It is about no regulation so we can do what we want. The fatal flaw is that people such as yourself still believe in our current business models.

  • Ted Seeber

    The moronic part is the assumption by most right-wingers that only governments kill people, NEVER business.

    • http://chicagoboyz.net TMLutas

      The assumption by right-wingers is not that only governments kill people, but rather that you can call businesses who kill people to account while doing it with government is much more difficult. With doctrines like sovereign immunity identical bad activities by government and private businesses will too often lead to no consequences when government does it and massive lawsuit when private businesses do it.

  • http://g Hezekiah Grxarrett

    I highly doubt, Dave, that it was sarcasm. I don’t know why anyone would even assume such.

  • http://g Hezekiah Grxarrett

    Because when it comes to lawyering up, me and Kaiser -permanente are pretty much equals.

  • Mike Walsh

    Abortion-on-demand was first sold in terms of “freedom” and “mercy”. In practice it now exists primarily to check the growth of an underclass brought into being by a public policy that supplanted traditional relationships with dependency upon the State. (And that is why it is virtually impossible to end the abortion entitlement. How do you put the genie back in the bottle, or repair those communities and relationships long ago destroyed?) The same people who persuaded us to re-classify what had been a class of human beings are at it again. The problem of unfunded retirement and healthcare mandates was caused by the same political class whose business is trading benefits for political power. And they will try to solve this problem by getting rid of the beneficiaries, or at least the more expensive ones. Currently being sold in terms of “freedom” (it’s my decision!) and “mercy” (look how they suffer!), soon it will be sold as a moral imperative. Then it won’t be sold, it will just be mandated. Knowing what we know of history, can we stop this before the policy becomes irreversible? I don’t know.


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