Show Me a Culture That Despises Virginity…

…and I will show you a culture that despises childhood.

Exhibit 23409823:  The sexualization of Candy Land.

And that ain’t all.

One of the best things you can do for your daughter is teach her not to measure herself by the light of a porn culture bent on enslaving her to fears about her looks or the imperious demand that she get laid in order to measure up to the expectations of marketers.

A human being with an obsession is a human being with little sales resistance.  That’s what drives this.

And, of course, the powers of hell, which lie behind the corporate worship of Mammon, Venus, and Mars who are now the gods in which America trusts.

  • http://www.facebook.com/metalheadpaladin Matt Cooper

    Mark, many thanks for this. As a new father of a little girl myself, I worry terribly about what she’ll pick up from consumer culture, and how it will affect both her health (physical, intellectual and spiritual). I’ve posted a link to your blog post on my own; as well as the Orenstein articles.

  • Imp the Vladaler

    Uh, look at the picture of the 1949 game. Lower left corner. Could that girl’s skirt be any shorter?

    1949!

  • Lydia Cubbedge

    Thanks for this! My five year old loves princessy things and, as a lover of fairy tales, I have been trying very hard to steer her away from the sexy Disney stuff, but it’s so pervasive even I get jaded and accustomed to it. Extra vigilance from now on! I can’t believe they sexied up Belle. Horror.

  • tedseeber

    The more I see this- the more I wonder. But in the article on why 6-year-old girls want to be sexy, it was pointed out that:

    “Starr and her research adviser and co-author, Gail Ferguson, also looked at factors that influenced the girls’ responses. Most of the girls were recruited from two public schools, but a smaller subset was recruited from a local dance studio. The girls in this latter group actually chose the non-sexualized doll more often for each of the four questions than did the public-school group. Being involved in dance and other sports has been linked to greater body appreciation and higher body image in teen girls and women, Starr said. [10 Odd Facts About the Female Body]

    “It’s possible that for young girls, dance involvement increased body esteem and created awareness that their bodies can be used for purposes besides looking sexy for others, and thus decreased self-sexualization.” (The researchers cautioned, however, that a previous study found that young girls in “aesthetic” sports like dance are more concerned about their weight than others.)”

    Given the normal attitude some of us conservative men have about liturgical dance, there seems to be a disconnect here between the way women view sexuality and the way men do; it seems to me that dance is *all* about “looking sexy for others” in very complex ways.

  • http://www.likelierthings.com/ Jon W

    I had that 1978 version.

    One other thing that bothers me is how THE WHOLE THING ISGETTINGMOREFRENETIC!!!!!!111

    “[E]ven if the Word of God were proclaimed in the modern world, how could one hear it with so much noise?” – Søren Kierkegaard

  • http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.fuentes.92 Rebecca Fuentes

    If the images on the article about why girls want to be sexy are indicative of what was used in the study, their results are skewed. 6-year-old girls like pink and purple and sparkle (for the most part). They like pretty. Cargo pants and a long-sleeve tee in beige and white are going to lose to just about ANY outfit. Why did my 6-yr-old daughter like the “Sexy” image? Because it looks like it has sparkles. Because it’s a skirt and skirts are prettier than pants. But, she didn’t like it better than the sundress she was wearing (which has pink and purple sparkly butterflies on it). I have to wonder what they presented as an alternative to the ‘sexy’ outfits in the study. I don’t particularly disagree with the conclusions, though. There’s a huge push for younger girls to be like older girls, and teens have been pushed into sexy adult fashions for years now. Even Louise May Alcott noticed over 100 years ago. Read her, “An Old-Fashioned Girl.”

    I have noticed a push for pretty to be redefined as sexy for a long time. It’s especially noticeable in the Hispanic community where I used to live. Women’s best outfits, the ones they wore to Christmas mass or the big celebration for Our Lady of Guadalupe, were often backless halter-tops, low-cut sparkly tops, very short skirts, etc. They were trying to look pretty, but the only way they knew how was to look sexy.

  • http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.fuentes.92 Rebecca Fuentes
    • Imp the Vladaler

      That’s so sexy. The pursed lips, the tongues sticking out, the catfighting. Mmm.

      It’s this sort of hypersexualized imagery that needs to be kept from children.

    • http://www.facebook.com/mr.alexanderson Alexander S Anderson

      I giggled at Ariel with a “fish face”.


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