The Queen of the May

Fr. Roderick Burke writes:

Here is another article from Fr. Angelo Geiger for the month of May, the month of Mary.

http://maryvictrix.com/2013/05/02/queen-of-the-may/

Keying off the May hymn “Bring Flowers of the Rarest” Fr. Angelo explains how Mary is the answer to fight against the false optimism of the new Paganism.

Here is a bulletized summary:

  • Hymn “Bring Flowers of the Rarest”, relation to the      liturgy, ambiguity regarding Paganism.
  • Pagan Queen of the May personification of spring.
  • May as the Month of Mary attempt to Christianize      another pagan holiday, to depaganize culture.
  • Pagan v. Christian conceptions of femininity and      virginity. Why the Christian God is a He. The Pantheism of paganism      associates immanent nature of femininity with deity, leading to feminism      and the masculine worship of sex.
  • Neo-paganism of John Lennon, Matthew Fox, association      of free love with creation-centered spirituality, same false optimism.
  • Jesuit Father Gerry Blaszczak on Pope Francis’      references to devil’s temptation to a pessimism regarding God’s      goodness, to eat the forbidden fruit, grasp at the false optimism that sin      is a virtue.
  • Mary is the true Queen of all Creation therefore the      true Queen of the May who gives the practical example of loyalty that lies      between pessimism and optimism.
  • St Joseph the worker is the loyal knight of Mary,      helping her to defend truth by keeping the Church’s teaching personalized,      real.
  • It is really about our heart’s desire for salvation and      Mary as the Universal Mother, Mediatrix and Coredemptrix is the Answer.

This May let’s give your hearts to Mary.

Sounds good to me!

  • http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.fuentes.92 Rebecca Fuentes

    A household devotion to Mary would be the best weapon against the early sexualization you posted about previously.

  • Rosemarie

    +J.M.J+

    I was just watching EWTN, and they said that the month of May did not become devoted to Mary until the 18th century. By then, Europe was already long Christianized, so I doubt this was an attempt to Christianize a pagan holiday or depaganize the culture.

    I’ve learned to be leery of the claim that popular holidays and traditions in Christian lands all originated in pre-Christian times. A lot of that has been debunked, but not before it became part of the mythology of Neopaganism. Yet Christians of times past were perfectly capable of coming up with their own celebrations


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X