John C. Wright Could Use a Bit of Help

A reader writes:

Have you heard about the debacle at Tor surrounding John C. Wright’s SF series? Some kind of editorial mix-up caused them to over-order copies of The Hermetic Millennia to the point that he can’t meet his sales goals. Tor has already cancelled the rest of the series, but he can appeal if Millennia sells through.

I bought the book when it came out, and I’m urging everyone I know to storm B&N, Amazon, and their local libraries to drive up sales. Mr. Wright, along with you and Mike Flynn, has been instrumental in giving me the fortitude to keep writing. I’m trying to give back, and I encourage others to do the same. If anything, Mr. Wright’s dilemma sounds like an occasion for a work of mercy, don’t you agree?

I do agree, although I don’t really think it mercy, but justice, to prosper such a fine writer and good man by paying him for his great work. If you are looking for a jolly read from a great fantasy writer, get this book! This is one of those times where doing good also happens to involve having fun.

  • The Ubiquitous

    It happens to be one of his best novels, and he is a fine writer.

  • introvert_prof

    I’d buy a copy, but I’ve already bought a copy and money is tight chez nous.

  • Silly Interloper

    Hard copy or soft copy?

  • Silly Interloper

    (Hard cover or paperback?)

    • http://blog.goliard.us/ Blog Goliard

      I’m presuming one would need to buy the hardcover, since the paperback isn’t out yet.

      I also presume that reading “Count to a Trillion” first would be highly recommended, if not required.

      • Rebecca Fuentes

        I’m about half-way through “Count to a Trillion” and I can’t imagine that “The Hermetic Millennium” would make any sense at all without reading it. His writing is always so rich.

  • http://thebackporchpundits.wordpress.com/ Christian Ohnimus

    Done and done.

  • The Deuce

    I think I’ll go with a Kindle copy, to help establish that an author can make a profit on talent, without being at the mercy of Tor’s screwups and editorial gatekeeping.

    • Irenist

      Certainly if Tor decides to punish him for their staffer’s mistake, Mr. Wright might well want to consider self-publishing with an assist from Amazon: his fans would presumably be sure to continue to seek out his work, no matter the publisher. I know I will.

      • The Deuce

        Well, I’m in the process of going through CTAT now, which I just bought on Amazon yesterday, and when I’m done with that I’ll do the same with THM, so he’ll get two Kindle sales out of me.

  • http://brianniemeier.com/ Brian Niemeier

    “…I don’t really think it mercy, but justice, to prosper such a fine writer and good man…”
    Amen, Mark! Thanks for passing this along.
    I’d also suggest that those interested get the physical copy instead of the ebook if possible. Tor said they’ll review their decision to cancel the series if the print version sells through.

    • chezami

      Do they say whether they mean hard cover or paperback?

      • http://brianniemeier.com/ Brian Niemeier

        Not as such. I just know what Wright said in the combox here: http://www.scifiwright.com/2013/08/done-er-almost/

        “What happened to me with THE HERMETIC MILLENNIA is that a staffer made a mistake and over-ordered the production — whether it was too many units or the manuscript was too long was not clear — and so I cannot make my numbers unless I sell out every single copy of the book. That is why I am pathetically begging my readers to go out and buy them all, because I have been informed the publisher will not buy the rest of the series. If the book sells through, I have some hope that they may reverse that decision.”

        I didn’t know the paperback was out. We should probably ask Mr. Wright which version Tor meant.

  • JS Frederick

    I bought Count To A Trillion from Barnes and Noble, and I have ordered The Hermetic Millenia from Amazon.

    I am about a quarter of the way through Count To A Trillion. I am enjoying it a lot, as John C. Wright has a vivid imagination and a beautiful writing style.


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