J.K. Rowling…

is a class act.

She also has given away a bazillion bucks to various charities. And years ago, when she was still writing Harry Potter, she would call an American fangirl who was dying of cancer and read her chapters as she was drafting them. She also helped her family out financially. I have enormous respect for her.

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  • Petey

    I share your opinion completely. also, as someone who earns his crust as a teacher of Latin, I point out that all the Latin in her books is correct.

    • Catholic pilgrim

      I agree. Except in the Potter movies where they butcher the Latin pronunciations of the spells, names of creatures & such with their Brit accents.

  • Mark S. (not for Shea)

    Ditto.

  • Catholic pilgrim

    Just read the article… Still crying. May God keep that brave girl & may our Blessed Mother Mary comfort her.

  • http://janalynmarie.blogspot.com/ Beadgirl

    It’s very dusty in my house apparently. *sniff.*

  • http://catholicinbrooklyn.blogspot.com Mary Griffin

    I am glad Rowling has seen fit to give to charity, but I can’t go so far as to call her a class act. Fr. Gabriel Amorth, the chief exorcist at the Vatican, has given stern warnings about how spiritually dangerous her books are in that they deal directly with witchcraft. Al Capone gave a fair amount of money away, too, but that doesn’t absolve him of what he did.

    I usually agree with you, Mark, but I think you are off base on this one.

    • HornOrSilk

      I hope Amorth never read any Latin classics, because they were written by pagans promoting paganism. You know, Cicero, Vergil, and the rest. Real pagans. Real paganism. Not this fictional witchcraft that everyone knows is fantasy.

      • http://catholicinbrooklyn.blogspot.com Mary Griffin

        You had better let Father Amorth know that.

        • HornOrSilk

          I find him to have a history of problematic claims, about himself and others. This is a good review of many such problems:

          http://www.canonlaw.info/a_amorth.htm

          And Mark had this: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/markshea/2011/11/fr-gabriele-amorth-loose-canon.html

          • http://catholicinbrooklyn.blogspot.com Mary Griffin

            We will definitely agree to disagree on this one. I don’t think the devil is anything to play with. I don’t need Harry Potter books for my well being, so I just play it safe and stay away.

            Mark is right on a lot of things, but no one bats 100%.

            • LSpinelli

              There isn’t any official Vatican pronouncement on the books, as far as I know.

              People read and listen to spiritually problematic things all the time. Myself included. Thanks to the solid Catholic foundation I was fortunate to get as a child, I was able to discern just how problematic the book, song or whatever in question was.

              Critical thinking helps here. Not outright banning.

              • HornOrSilk

                Not any official statements, no. But there are many things coming from Vatican sources:

                http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/1102767.htm
                http://www.cesnur.org/recens/potter_mi_eng.htm

                But there are negative expressions:
                http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/harry_potter_wrong_model_of_a_hero_vatican_newspaper_says/

                Nonetheless, I stand with Chesterton, Tolkien and Lewis on magic. As I think you do too :) But what is interesting is those, like the article above, try to differentiate Tolkien and Lewis from Potter. I don’t think that writer read much of either, for if they did, they would know Tolkien wrote fictional versions of Norse myths and Lewis wrote a new version of a Greek pagan myth (Till We Have Faces). Far more pagan than Potter!

                • Dave G.

                  I think the problem is, just because HP is fantasy, that doesn’t mean she needs to be compared to Lewis or Tolkien. They were in a different league even if they worked in the same genre.

                  • HornOrSilk

                    The issue is that people try to act like Tolkien and Lewis would oppose “pagan” literature, and she, using “witchcraft” was “pagan” far opposed to the work of Tolkien and Lewis. The fact is, both Tolkien and Lewis had a love for classical pagan mythmaking, and engaged it in a far greater way than Rowling, though truth be told, she does follow Tolkien and Lewis by trying to have the Gospel at the heart of her tale!

                  • chezami

                    No. The problem is that Christians cavalierly slander Rowling as a witch and an evil person for using literary devices that Lewis and Tolkien used, because they are too stupid, ignorant, malicious, or prejudiced to acknowledge that they are engaging in slander.

                    • Dave G.

                      I’ve known Christians going after things like this since before I was one. I remember in high school when D&D was the big thing,and the backlash was the same as that against HP. Maybe worse. I even know some who won’t touch Tolkien or Lewis either. Go figure. But I think trying to compare them all as if they’re the same isn’t fair and doesn’t serve the argument. They are different, even if the genre is the same. Except for those Christians who are against the genre altogether (except for Wizard of Oz, which for some reason is seldom attacked by those who will attack almost anything else).

                    • Dave G.

                      Or let me restate this. I mean that some point to the differences between Rowling and the others as some sort of proof that her’s is of the Devil. Sure, Tolkien wasn’t that or Lewis. They’re making this or that point. But not Rowling. Clearly she is because her books are different this or that way. I say they are different. But that doesn’t mean she’s suddenly guilty of something the others aren’t. She’s not in their league, and having made it through the series I can see clear differences. But presence of differences does not equal Satanism. That’s what I was trying to say.

            • HornOrSilk

              You don’t need the internet for your well-being. You are more likely to find it a cause of sin than Harry Potter a cause of sin for children.

            • jroberts548

              Why are you talking about bats? Witches use bats. You’re putting your immortal soul at risk.

          • Petey

            thanks for the canonlaw.info link. very informative.

      • ivan_the_mad

        Or Tolkien, or Lewis, or Charles Williams, or Russell Kirk …

        • HornOrSilk

          Of course. Though it’s always funny to me when I see some try to claim Lewis would hate Potter. It’s clear they didn’t read Lewis talk about his love for myth, especially pagan myths.

          • jroberts548

            If anything, Lewis would hate Harry Potter for not being nearly pagan enough. Their “magic” is apparently genetic, and they’re all agnostics who celebrate Christmas. There’s a lot of magic, but very little is supernatural.

            • chezami

              Actually, Rowling self-identifies as a practicing Christian and each novel (and the entire story arc) very consciously recapitulates the Paschal mystery. She herself said in an interview that she was a Christian but did not talk about it a lot because she didn’t want to give away the end of the story. She’s a huge admirer of Tolkien and Lewis (among many other influences). The stories are easily fit into the genre of Christian fiction.

    • Sus_1

      My kids see the devil watching the news. We can handle fiction.

      I treasure the family fun of reading these books aloud. It was a special time for us.

    • http://hjg.com.ar/ Hernán J. González
  • Diadidia

    Rowling has a background in witchcraft (schooled), 5 exorcists have had demons admit that 60% of the names used in her books are actual demos, the spells are real. According to the exoists the demons took credit for inspiring Rowlings to write the books. Evil is not always easy to discern, when written to amuse children (targets) and bypass the parent’s natural instinct to protect.

    • chezami

      I defy you document any of this rubbish. You slander a good woman’s name with quack gossip. Repent.

      • Diadidia

        Posted by Supertradmum

        I am repeating some information from Fr. Chad Ripperger as well as another exorcist I have known personally for 45 years. Why do so many Catholics lack discernment? What is blocking their discernment?

        Firstly, D and D is a door to possession and leads to obsession. I put one article on my blog in which an exorcist refers to this in May.

        Secondly, Harry Potter is a door and more than that. Here is a paraphrase of a section from a talk by Fr. Ripperger. (And I had first-hand experience of the last point years ago.)

        … J. K Rowling went to witch school. Five demons said in an exorcism that they inspired her to write the books. All the spells are real and up to 60% of the characters are names of demons according to some exorcists.

        • Sus_1

          There’s a part of me that wishes the spells are real. Cut down my time delivering the kids all over the place. They could sprinkle floo powder and travel via fireplaces instead of my vehicle with me at the wheel.

          There may be some people that might get a little nutty with Harry Potter but I bet they are nutty before reading Harry Potter.

        • LSpinelli

          This is straight out of Jack Chick fundamentalism. Really, there are times I can’t tell the difference between them and reactionary trad Catholics. Same fear-laden scaremongering junk wrapped in different packages.

        • chezami

          Fr. Chad Ripperger knows this stuff how exactly? Details. Documentation please. Witch school where? Prove it.

          • Diadidia

            Mark, Fr. Chad Ripperger’s website: http://www.sensustraditious.org, you can check it out, I can’t download to your site, his material is copyrighted. His talk on witchcraft is readily available. Diadida

            • chezami

              You don’t have to download anything. Just tell me how he knows that Rowling went to ‘witch’s school”. Because I don’t believe a word of that and I defy you or him to document it. What you and he are doing is bearing false witness against your neighbor unless you can document this slander.

              • Diadidia

                Father Ripperger’s talks on Demons – he states, “Rowlings did research on witchcraft….” Because we do not have jurisdiction (we are lay people, not Exocists) and when we SAY or READ the names of actual demons we give them glory and power, opening the door for them to act on you and your kids. We are in enemy territory, and Jesus has broken their power, but why would you want to KNOW them, read about them, and show any interest in them? Please show your defiance to Father Ripperger, a priest who has more knowledge, insight, and jurisdiction in understanding the demonic activity in our modern culture. I appreciate your concern for defending someone’s reputation, but the choice of subject, use of spells, popularity of her books, AND HER TARGETTED AUDIENCE makes the author suspect. Please check out Father Ripperger’s website, and listen to his homilies on Demons, and then decide. And the spells are real, some have been tried and they worked. The subject of Harry Potter is not benign, and you are being NAIVE if you think we can expose our kids to this without effect. THINK about it, Jesus cast out spirits, and to think we are trying to make them out as non existant, harmless, or not real we are not protecting are kids, but giving them over (if you will) to spirits, not Holy.

                • HornOrSilk

                  She did “research.” Apparently, you have done “research” by reading his discussions on witchcraft. Makes you a witch, right?

                  What kind of “research” did she do? Historical research? That’s something the Church promotes.

                  As for the “names” of devils, seriously, this is ludicrous as people have pointed out. I mean, Draco? So, reading Latin must be pro-demon.

                  There are many priests who are pro-Potter. You want an argument from authority by someone making ridiculous claims which only hold water if the audience is ignorant.

                  • HornOrSilk

                    I would also add, it is the superstition you promote which gives the devil such power. I mean, your claim that we should not even read the names of devils would mean we should not read the Bible, and the Bible authors, by writing them down, gave them power.

                    And what spells are in her works? I’m telling you the truth, when you are on a computer, you are summoning more daemons than there are spells in her books.

                • chezami

                  Yes, I know he *says* this. How does he *prove* any of this? You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor. So far I have not a reason in the world t believe either of you.

    • jroberts548

      Which names? Which exorcists? And why are there demons named Arthur and Molly? If I were a demon, I’d have a cooler sounding name, like diadidia.

      • Diadidia

        LOL, diadidia!

  • Petey

    once on the TV I heard a bible thumper warn her audience of schoolchildren not to say the word ‘weird’ b/c the Weirds was an alternate name for the Fates or Norns. and if you say that word, then you know what may happen.


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