Action Alert: Nazia Quazi

This was written by Thea Lim and originally appeared at Racialicious.We are late on picking up the story of Nazia Quazi, a Canadian woman being held against her will in Saudi Arabia.The Coast recently ran an interview with Quazi, explaining her situation: A Canadian woman being held against her will in Saudi Arabia says the Canadian government is not taking her plight seriously.Nazia Quazi was taken to Saudi Arabia by her father in November 2007. Because of that country’s archaic g … [Read more...]

Friday Links — March 26, 2010

Salam alaikum, readers! It's been awhile, but we're back to our regular Friday links! I'm still a little jet-lagged, so there may be stories missing. As always, if you see a news story about Muslim women that isn't on our links, feel free to post it in the comments!A judge at Riyadh Summary Court has ridiculed calls for the construction of extra floors just for women at the Grand Mosque in Mecca.elan speaks with Maria Ebrahimji about working in the media.Women activists in New Delhi … [Read more...]

Niqab by Numbers: Quantifying the Overreactions

I am so, so sick of talking about the niqab.  So I'm not really going to, despite the fact that the Canadian province of Quebec recently introduced a bill that, if made law, would force everyone to show their face when dealing with provincial government bodies.  If anyone else has intelligent insight on recent Quebec-related media coverage, please share.  I, for one, can't think of anything new that I haven't said a million times already.  You'd think the politicians would get as tired of this as … [Read more...]

“Save the Muslim Girl!” Part III

This was written by Özlem Sensoy and Elizabeth Marshall, and originally appeared in Rethinking Schools Online. Part I & Part II ran earlier this week.Learning a Stereotype Lesson #3: Muslim Girls and Women Want To Be Saved by the WestFor many in the West, the plight of Afghanistan is framed exclusively within a post 9/11, U.S.-led “war on terror.” While radical women’s organizations like RAWA have condemned brutality against women in Afghanistan for decades, their voices were absent, and … [Read more...]

“Save the Muslim Girl!” Part II

This was written by Özlem Sensoy and Elizabeth Marshall, and originally appeared in Rethinking Schools Online. You can read Part I here.Learning a Stereotype Lesson #2: Veiled = OppressedGendered violence in Middle Eastern countries, or the threat of it, organizes many of the books’ plots. With few exceptions, the “good” civilized men in the girl’s family are taken from her. In Under the Persimmon Tree, a brother and father are forced to join the Taliban as fighters, while in The Breadwin … [Read more...]

“Save the Muslim Girl!” Part I

This was written by Özlem Sensoy and Elizabeth Marshall, and originally appeared at Rethinking Schools Online.Does popular young adult fiction about Muslim girls build understanding or reinforce stereotypes?Young adult titles that focus on the lives of Muslim girls in the Middle East, written predominantly by white women, have appeared in increasing numbers since Sept. 11, 2001. A short list includes Deborah Ellis’s trilogy The Breadwinner, Parvana’s Journey, and Mud City; Suzanne Fisher Sta … [Read more...]

The Jewel of Edina: Kicking Ass and Taking Names

Edina Lekovic, the Communications Director for the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles, says the hardest part of her job is convincing the media to run non-crisis stories about Muslims. Yusra interviews her to figure out what drives the woman we see on TV.Yusra: You work as the communications director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles—and you've called yourself a translator between Muslims and mainstream journalists. What's the hardest part of that job?Edina L … [Read more...]


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