Merrily Roar Out Our Harvest Home!

I love all the different names our holidays have, and how they are celebrated in different traditions. The Wild Hunt has a nice feature up this morning with a fantastic picture of the Long Man of Wilmington.

Supposedly the name Mabon is a recent thing, attributed to Aidan Kelly in the 70′s, and it’s reference to an obscure character in Arthurian legend has always struck me as odd. What I’ve really been digging is more traditionally English names for our holidays, rather then the Gaelic ones that are popular. Maybe it’s because I’ve been sitting with things Anglo-Saxon a good bit of late. At any rate, I’m really digging the concept of Harvest Home.

Lammas is such a happy festival. It’s when we’re happy we finally got some good vine-ripe tomatoes and we have cucumbers, okra, and bunches of other yummy veggies to nosh on. The real work of harvest hasn’t begun yet. By the autumnal equinox that chill in the air is warning us to get our lives in order and batten down for a long, cold winter. To paraphrase Gus diZerega, we are balanced on the edge and tipping over into darkness.

It’s a scary thought, really. The earth is cooling down. While the sun provided all the heat and light we needed all summer, we have to provide that for ourselves in the dark half of the year. While once that meant having enough fuel for the fire and candle and lamp oil, today it means being able to afford heating bills and power bills. It’s not just about physical well-being either. The lack of light affects our mood, it changes our perception and turns our thoughts inward.

Finding ourselves balanced on the autumnal equinox is recognizing that Hallows is coming, the earth is bracing for the cold of winter and that our lives are changing irrevocably. When spring returns we will no longer be the same person we were. We will have been tempered by another winter, have reflected through another Hallows, and found hope in another Yule. Every year of our lives is different from all the others. This summer will never come again. The Wheel keeps on turning.

I think this is why we reach out to one another on this holiday. Why it feels more like a thanksgiving, a time to have your loved ones close about you and a time to feast. We are embarking on a voyage through darkness, through the dark half of the year, and if anything staves off the fear, anxiety and uncertainty, it’s drawing close to loved ones and celebrating a full pantry. We are together, we are prepared for the barren season and we’re going to make it.

Whether it consists of love, of children, of professional success, of spiritual enlightenment or material comforts, may you merrily roar out your Harvest Home!

YouTube Preview Image
About Star Foster

Polytheistic Wiccan initiated into the Ravenwood tradition, she has many opinions. Some of them are actually useful.

  • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

    Mabon might also be from the name of Mab, “Queen of the Fairies”, Irish Goddess of mead, also known as Maeve, Medb, Maub, Mabh, Madron or Madrone, St. Madron (the female one, with the holy well) and Maude.  She’s sometimes depicted as a “hag”, scary old lady, or a mother, or a tiny being in a chariot made of a nut pulled by butterflies, with a jar of goodies, with wings, or drunk off her behind.  Likely she had some connection w/ the harvest, wheat & other grains, and brewing.  Madder might be named for her.  Shakespeare and Ben Jonson each mention her.  Mab is NOT the Maeva of Connaught in the Cu Cullain stories.  She might, however, be the mother of Mabon in the Mabinogion.  In my family folklore tradition, she taught people how to hunt so they’d not starve, so today’s a big deal for us.

    Have a lovely Equinox holiday, by whatever name.  BTW I really like the  songs and videos you’ve posted for each season.

    • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

      I can’t agree with that at all…

      Mabon is the Welsh reflex of the Gaulish and (Romano-)British deity Maponos, pure and simple.  His mother was Modron, and there’s really no confusing the two.  He appears in various of the Trioedd Ynys Prydein and in Culhwch ac Olwen, but none of the other tales associated with the Mabinogi, nor at all in the Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi itself.  Medb (Old Irish; Modern Irish Meadhbh, anglicized as Maeve) is most certainly the figure found in the Ulster Cycle tales related to Cú Chulainn, but she’s not equivalent to Mab; and the suggestion that Medb is the “Irish Goddess of Mead” is not quite correct as well.  She’s certainly a reflex of a sovereignty goddess, her name means “intoxicating one,” but that she was actually a goddess rather than the human representative of the goddess is over-reading most of the evidence.

      As to how “Mab” came about in Shakespeare (which is the figure you’re describing), there’s a variety of possibilities, but they’re probably not direct from either Medb (despite the similarity of name) or from Modron.  It’s impossible to linguistically link Medb and Modron, and thus impossible to get Mab from Modron at all.

      Mabon-type figures (like Pryderi/Gwri in the First Branch) seem to be associated more with the “big” Welsh holiday of Kalan Mai (May 1), but not with any equinox, so it’s always struck me as odd that his name was chosen by Aidan for this particular occasion…

      • Jack Heron

        I’ve also encountered an association in various writings between Queen Mab and the May Queen, but I’m not sure how scholarly this is.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Thank you for your input.  In a folkloric tradition (stories handed down from elders) it’s often difficult to discern what came from where… I often find that many of the tales have common origins. 

        There was a great deal of trade between the P-Celts and Q-Celts, as well as the Romans and others… and slavery, too.  There’s a lot of examples of cross-cultural folklore.  Slaves took care of kids, and told the youngsters their own home tales, which were incorporated into the overculture over time.  Eventually the tales were written as literature by monks, who brought their own interpretations…. only 1/8 of all Welsh literature has been translated into Latin, and of that, only about 1/4 was translated into English.  Often badly.  I’ll be overjoyed when these texts are finally translated and made available… looking forward to how much family folklore and shared tales appear in the different versions of the written literature.

        I made the determination of Mab and Maeve and Medb and Modron being the same being, becuz of the connection to alcohol.  “Intoxicating one” and “Entering the Realm of the Fae” are so often used as metaphors for inebriation, as well as someone being “intoxicating” as considered attractive.  Mab also brings good dreams, so there might be the otherworld travel / meditation / trance connection.  There are Modron’s wellsprings and St. Modron holy wells, where alcohol was offered, and the euphemism about alcohol being the “water of life”.  Modron doesn’t appear in many places in literature, nor does Mabon (both Mab and Map are Welsh terms for “boy” or “son”), and in the sources you’d listed they’re both backstage characters. 

        I’ve heard many references to Mab being the May Queen, too…  in our family folklore she was also the leader of the Hunt… not the Wild Hunt but the one who taught people how to use edged weapons and arrow points… and who evaded soldiers and slavers.

        • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

          There wasn’t just trade:  the Irish had colonies in Dyfed (South Wales), Cornwall, and in Gwynedd (North Wales), which lasted for centuries, and explains how the knowledge of Latin necessary to have created the ogam alphabet got transmitted back to the areas of Munster in which ogam began, and is most plentifully attested (on stones) currently.  It’s also why the Irish influence on Welsh literature is pervasive:  the first three branches of the Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi are all thoroughly influenced by Irish to the point that they’re not really conceivable without it.

          I’m not sure what you’re talking about with the “1/8″ and “1/4″ figures, though…some of the earliest literature currently extant from Britain is Welsh poetry like Y Gododdin and the historical Taliesin poems, and all of that has been translated for years, and has never needed to be translated into Latin as an intermediary.  The Welsh were also using Latin to write things in the early centuries (as did everyone who was literate through Christianization), but what is found in the Latin writings (e.g. Historia Brittonum) is often rather different than the Welsh versions.  There’s a ton of this stuff out there published, it’s just you have to know where to look (usually a very good university library) or be willing to shell out rather a lot of money (the Trioedd Ynys Prydein‘s latest edition is about $150).  Welsh and scholarship on it is quite alive and well in Wales itself, as well as a few other places.

  • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

    Mabon might also be from the name of Mab, “Queen of the Fairies”, Irish Goddess of mead, also known as Maeve, Medb, Maub, Mabh, Madron or Madrone, St. Madron (the female one, with the holy well) and Maude.  She’s sometimes depicted as a “hag”, scary old lady, or a mother, or a tiny being in a chariot made of a nut pulled by butterflies, with a jar of goodies, with wings, or drunk off her behind.  Likely she had some connection w/ the harvest, wheat & other grains, and brewing.  Madder might be named for her.  Shakespeare and Ben Jonson each mention her.  Mab is NOT the Maeva of Connaught in the Cu Cullain stories.  She might, however, be the mother of Mabon in the Mabinogion.  In my family folklore tradition, she taught people how to hunt so they’d not starve, so today’s a big deal for us.

    Have a lovely Equinox holiday, by whatever name.  BTW I really like the  songs and videos you’ve posted for each season.

    • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

      I can’t agree with that at all…

      Mabon is the Welsh reflex of the Gaulish and (Romano-)British deity Maponos, pure and simple.  His mother was Modron, and there’s really no confusing the two.  He appears in various of the Trioedd Ynys Prydein and in Culhwch ac Olwen, but none of the other tales associated with the Mabinogi, nor at all in the Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi itself.  Medb (Old Irish; Modern Irish Meadhbh, anglicized as Maeve) is most certainly the figure found in the Ulster Cycle tales related to Cú Chulainn, but she’s not equivalent to Mab; and the suggestion that Medb is the “Irish Goddess of Mead” is not quite correct as well.  She’s certainly a reflex of a sovereignty goddess, her name means “intoxicating one,” but that she was actually a goddess rather than the human representative of the goddess is over-reading most of the evidence.

      As to how “Mab” came about in Shakespeare (which is the figure you’re describing), there’s a variety of possibilities, but they’re probably not direct from either Medb (despite the similarity of name) or from Modron.  It’s impossible to linguistically link Medb and Modron, and thus impossible to get Mab from Modron at all.

      Mabon-type figures (like Pryderi/Gwri in the First Branch) seem to be associated more with the “big” Welsh holiday of Kalan Mai (May 1), but not with any equinox, so it’s always struck me as odd that his name was chosen by Aidan for this particular occasion…

      • Jack Heron

        I’ve also encountered an association in various writings between Queen Mab and the May Queen, but I’m not sure how scholarly this is.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Thank you for your input.  In a folkloric tradition (stories handed down from elders) it’s often difficult to discern what came from where… I often find that many of the tales have common origins. 

        There was a great deal of trade between the P-Celts and Q-Celts, as well as the Romans and others… and slavery, too.  There’s a lot of examples of cross-cultural folklore.  Slaves took care of kids, and told the youngsters their own home tales, which were incorporated into the overculture over time.  Eventually the tales were written as literature by monks, who brought their own interpretations…. only 1/8 of all Welsh literature has been translated into Latin, and of that, only about 1/4 was translated into English.  Often badly.  I’ll be overjoyed when these texts are finally translated and made available… looking forward to how much family folklore and shared tales appear in the different versions of the written literature.

        I made the determination of Mab and Maeve and Medb and Modron being the same being, becuz of the connection to alcohol.  “Intoxicating one” and “Entering the Realm of the Fae” are so often used as metaphors for inebriation, as well as someone being “intoxicating” as considered attractive.  Mab also brings good dreams, so there might be the otherworld travel / meditation / trance connection.  There are Modron’s wellsprings and St. Modron holy wells, where alcohol was offered, and the euphemism about alcohol being the “water of life”.  Modron doesn’t appear in many places in literature, nor does Mabon (both Mab and Map are Welsh terms for “boy” or “son”), and in the sources you’d listed they’re both backstage characters. 

        I’ve heard many references to Mab being the May Queen, too…  in our family folklore she was also the leader of the Hunt… not the Wild Hunt, but a Sacred Hunt… Mab was the one who taught people how to use edged weapons and arrow points to hunt… so there is the Mabon / Equinox connection, with hunting and Deer Season.

        We also consider Mab / Maub / Maude to be an ancestor, cuz we’re arrogant like that.

        • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

          There wasn’t just trade:  the Irish had colonies in Dyfed (South Wales), Cornwall, and in Gwynedd (North Wales), which lasted for centuries, and explains how the knowledge of Latin necessary to have created the ogam alphabet got transmitted back to the areas of Munster in which ogam began, and is most plentifully attested (on stones) currently.  It’s also why the Irish influence on Welsh literature is pervasive:  the first three branches of the Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi are all thoroughly influenced by Irish to the point that they’re not really conceivable without it.

          I’m not sure what you’re talking about with the “1/8″ and “1/4″ figures, though…some of the earliest literature currently extant from Britain is Welsh poetry like Y Gododdin and the historical Taliesin poems, and all of that has been translated for years, and has never needed to be translated into Latin as an intermediary.  The Welsh were also using Latin to write things in the early centuries (as did everyone who was literate through Christianization), but what is found in the Latin writings (e.g. Historia Brittonum) is often rather different than the Welsh versions.  There’s a ton of this stuff out there published, it’s just you have to know where to look (usually a very good university library) or be willing to shell out rather a lot of money (the Trioedd Ynys Prydein‘s latest edition is about $150).  Welsh and scholarship on it is quite alive and well in Wales itself, as well as a few other places.

  • http://twitter.com/ashareem HR Mitchell

    There’s no “supposedly” about it. Aidan proposed both “Mabon” and “Litha” in an article in Green Egg around 1974 or 75 (I’d check but all of my old issues are in storage, something I really do remedy.)

    Some of us never adopted them.

    • http://twitter.com/MariAdkins Mari Adkins

      now we call our midsummer festival “lady’s day” or “litha’s day”. fall equinox is “hellith’s day” – counterpart to the spring’s “herdda’s day”. and if my tradition’s lore is to be believed, we didn’t start celebrating the equinoxes until the late 1800s when someone studied elsewhere where they were celebrated and thought they’d be a great addition to our liturgy. imho, those two rituals are poorly worded and stick out like sore thumbs.

      and from the comment above. mab as a scary old lady? really?

      • http://twitter.com/ashareem HR Mitchell

        I’d consider a goodly majority of the Fae to be scary, but that’s me.

        That’s interesting about Lady’s Day, I learned that as the traditional name of the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin (25 March), long before formally coming in to Craft, and a number of the paganfolk in the 70s referred to the March equinox by that name. (This was in the dark ages, before Ostara had been so widely adopted – and if I am remembering correctly, also proposed in that same article by Kelly, but it might predate that.)

        • http://twitter.com/MariAdkins Mari Adkins

          well yeah, you do make a point. the fey aren’t kind. :}

          thanks for the link.

        • AnnaKorn

          I concur about “Lady Day” being an old name for Ostara. For example, Gwydion’s Song, “On Lady Day,” on his Songs for the Old Religion album, shows this old usage.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Yup.  Mab as a scary old woman.  Think of Maeva on a bender.  This prolly also had to do with Mab’s sacred Hunt symbolism and death, as I’ve written elsewhere in this part of the comments section.  Maybe associated with the Mailte y Nos, who is Mathilda in the Norse regions… the stereotypical broomstick witch.

    • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

      Litha was also used by The Venerable Bede.

    • AnnaKorn

      Aidan claims to have introduced “Litha” to Paganism, but I doubt it was truly new. It is from the Saxon word for Midsummer, and was familiar to millions of readers of the Lord of the Rings, since speakers of Westron, such as Hobbits, also used it for the name of the Midsummer festival. I never  previously heard of  Kelly’s also claiming Mabon (from Maponus or Mabon ap Modron, either Gaulish or Welsh) as a word he’d introduced. It is true that the Green Egg undertook to popularize Pagan names for the Eight Spokes of the Wheel, rather than calling them things like “the Autumnal equinox.” I find it further intriguing that some of the festival names have continued to evolve in a popular context. For instance, Imbolg / Oimelc (the Irish and Saxon names for 2 February) have taken on the names “Brigid” and even “Brigida” among many Pagans I know. 
      The idea of a Wheel of the Year with eight spokes only entered modern Paganism after the adoption of the eight sabbats by Gardner’s coven in 1957. Prior to that, the Wiccan year-cycle had only four Sabbats, and British Druids had only three festivals until 1964.

      • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

        No, Imbolc is Irish; and so is Oimelc, it’s just a different attempt at making sense of the holiday through etymology (and a late and erroneous medieval one, at that); and, both were on 1 Feb.  Because people know, however, that it’s a festival of (St.) Brigid, they’ve decided to call it by her name rather than anything else.

  • http://twitter.com/ashareem HRM

    There’s no “supposedly” about it. Aidan proposed both “Mabon” and “Litha” in an article in Green Egg around 1974 or 75 (I’d check but all of my old issues are in storage, something I really do remedy.)

    Some of us never adopted them.

    • http://about.me/mariadkins Mari Adkins

      now we call our midsummer festival “lady’s day” or “litha’s day”. fall equinox is “hellith’s day” – counterpart to the spring’s “herdda’s day”. and if my tradition’s lore is to be believed, we didn’t start celebrating the equinoxes until the late 1800s when someone studied elsewhere where they were celebrated and thought they’d be a great addition to our liturgy. imho, those two rituals are poorly worded and stick out like sore thumbs.

      and from the comment above. mab as a scary old lady? really?

      • http://twitter.com/ashareem HRM

        I’d consider a goodly majority of the Fae to be scary, but that’s me.

        That’s interesting about Lady’s Day, I learned that as the traditional name of the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin (25 March), long before formally coming in to Craft, and a number of the paganfolk in the 70s referred to the March equinox by that name. (This was in the dark ages, before Ostara had been so widely adopted – and if I am remembering correctly, also proposed in that same article by Kelly, but it might predate that.)

        A touch more on Lady Day/Ostara – http://www.sacred-texts.com/bos/bos049.htm

        • http://about.me/mariadkins Mari Adkins

          well yeah, you do make a point. the fey aren’t kind. :}

          thanks for the link.

        • AnnaKorn

          I concur about “Lady Day” being an old name for Ostara. For example, Gwydion’s Song, “On Lady Day,” on his Songs for the Old Religion album, shows this old usage.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Yup.  Mab as a scary old woman.  Think of Maeva on a bender.  This prolly also had to do with Mab’s sacred Hunt symbolism and death, as I’ve written elsewhere in this part of the comments section.  Maybe associated with the Mailte y Nos, who is Mathilda in the Norse regions… the stereotypical broomstick witch.

    • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

      Litha was also used by The Venerable Bede.

    • AnnaKorn

      Aidan claims to have introduced “Litha” to Paganism, but I doubt it was truly new. It is from the Saxon word for Midsummer, and was familiar to millions of readers of the Lord of the Rings, since speakers of Westron, such as Hobbits, also used it for the name of the Midsummer festival. I never  previously heard of  Kelly’s also claiming Mabon (from Maponus or Mabon ap Modron, either Gaulish or Welsh) as a word he’d introduced. It is true that the Green Egg undertook to popularize Pagan names for the Eight Spokes of the Wheel, rather than calling them things like “the Autumnal equinox.” I find it further intriguing that some of the festival names have continued to evolve in a popular context. For instance, Imbolg / Oimelc (the Irish and Saxon names for 2 February) have taken on the names “Brigid” and even “Brigida” among many Pagans I know. 
      The idea of a Wheel of the Year with eight spokes only entered modern Paganism after the adoption of the eight sabbats by Gardner’s coven in 1957. Prior to that, the Wiccan year-cycle had only four Sabbats, and British Druids had only three festivals until 1964.

      • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

        No, Imbolc is Irish; and so is Oimelc, it’s just a different attempt at making sense of the holiday through etymology (and a late and erroneous medieval one, at that); and, both were on 1 Feb.  Because people know, however, that it’s a festival of (St.) Brigid, they’ve decided to call it by her name rather than anything else.

  • http://twitter.com/lysana Brenda Daverin

    The Alban names for the solstices and equinoxes are Welsh, not “Gaelic.” Just to be thorough, what many call Gaelic is actually Irish, as noted in the constitution of the Republic of Ireland. Gaelic is more properly applied to Scots Gaelic.

    • http://twitter.com/MariAdkins Mari Adkins

      here are three of the welsh feast names that i have (welsh being the second name given):

      Samhain – Nos Galen-gaeof (that is, the Night of the Winter Calends)

      Beltane – Galan-Mai (Calends of May)

      Lughnasadh – Gwyl Awst (August Feast)

    • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

      Indeed, Star–Brenda is 100% correct on every point with this.  Though “Gaelic” can refer to a group of languages, formerly called “Goidelic,” which includes Irish, Scots Gaelic, and Manx, just saying “Gaelic” in any of those countries means Scots Gaelic very specifically; Irish people call their language “Irish,” and are rather insistent about it (understandably!).

      As I mentioned to Alice above, Mabon is not just an obscure Arthurian character, he’s the Welsh reflex of a definite deity from ancient British and Gaulish religion, Maponos/Maponus.  But, why he’s been chosen by Aidan Kelly to be connected to this date, I have no clue…it’s never made any sense to me.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Anyone with “on” in the middle is a deity:  EpONa, MapONus, SirONa, DON, etc.

        • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

          Though there are a lot that don’t:  Grannus, Belenus, Cathubodua, Nehalennia, Belatucadrus, Cocidius, etc.  Thus, you can’t exactly use it as a diagnostic feature of theonymns.

    • Anonymous

      As an undergrad in the ’70s enrolled in a Celtic studies series where we were told, by my professor, that Welsh is Brythonnic Celt.  (From my class notes) (Can’t believe I still have these…): “One of the several headed family of Celtic languages which is divided into two main groups: Giodelic (Scots, Irish) & Brythonnic (Welsh, Cornish, Brittany)”.  There is more to the story, I am sure…

      • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

        Yes; but “Alban” refers to the Irish name for Britain, Alba, and Brenda was just using that because it’s culturally appropriate to do so for her own situation.

        • Anonymous

          True – it is. (I didn’t really say anything about that.)  Didn’t a number of the Celtic tribe of Pre-Roman days speak Brythonnic Celt? 

          • Anonymous

             There are Celts all over the place- I seem to have family from the Po River valley in Italy, where there are Celts and have been there since they “drove out the Etruscans”

          • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

            Well, there are several Celtic groups in Italy, including the Cisalpine Gauls and the Lepontic people.

          • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

            Yes, all of the people of ancient Britain (with the exception of the Picts, though their language may be an extremely archaic version of Brythonic) spoke Brythonic languages.

  • http://twitter.com/lysana Brenda/Lysana/either

    The Alban names for the solstices and equinoxes are Welsh, not “Gaelic.” Just to be thorough, what many call Gaelic is actually Irish, as noted in the constitution of the Republic of Ireland. Gaelic is more properly applied to Scots Gaelic.

    • http://about.me/mariadkins Mari Adkins

      here are three of the welsh feast names that i have (welsh being the second name given):

      Samhain – Nos Galen-gaeof (that is, the Night of the Winter Calends)

      Beltane – Galan-Mai (Calends of May)

      Lughnasadh – Gwyl Awst (August Feast)

    • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

      Indeed, Star–Brenda is 100% correct on every point with this.  Though “Gaelic” can refer to a group of languages, formerly called “Goidelic,” which includes Irish, Scots Gaelic, and Manx, just saying “Gaelic” in any of those countries means Scots Gaelic very specifically; Irish people call their language “Irish,” and are rather insistent about it (understandably!).

      As I mentioned to Alice above, Mabon is not just an obscure Arthurian character, he’s the Welsh reflex of a definite deity from ancient British and Gaulish religion, Maponos/Maponus.  But, why he’s been chosen by Aidan Kelly to be connected to this date, I have no clue…it’s never made any sense to me.

      • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

        Anyone with “on” in the middle is a deity:  EpONa, MapONus, SirONa, DON, etc.

        • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

          Though there are a lot that don’t:  Grannus, Belenus, Cathubodua, Nehalennia, Belatucadrus, Cocidius, etc.  Thus, you can’t exactly use it as a diagnostic feature of theonymns.

    • LezlieKinyon

      As an undergrad in the ’70s enrolled in a Celtic studies series where we were told, by my professor, that Welsh is Brythonnic Celt.  (From my class notes) (Can’t believe I still have these…): “One of the several headed family of Celtic languages which is divided into two main groups: Giodelic (Scots, Irish) & Brythonnic (Welsh, Cornish, Brittany)”.  There is more to the story, I am sure…

      • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

        Yes; but “Alban” refers to the Irish name for Britain, Alba, and Brenda was just using that because it’s culturally appropriate to do so for her own situation.

        • LezlieKinyon

          True – it is. (I didn’t really say anything about that.)  Didn’t a number of the Celtic tribe of Pre-Roman days speak Brythonnic Celt? 

          • LezlieKinyon

             There are Celts all over the place- I seem to have family from the Po River valley in Italy, where there are Celts and have been there since they “drove out the Etruscans”

          • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

            Well, there are several Celtic groups in Italy, including the Cisalpine Gauls and the Lepontic people.

          • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

            Yes, all of the people of ancient Britain (with the exception of the Picts, though their language may be an extremely archaic version of Brythonic) spoke Brythonic languages.

  • Anonymous

    Great post.

    I love the dark half of the year! Personally, it is more in sync with my natural sleep patterns. I’m always a little sad when the winter solstice comes and goes because I know it’s now starting to get lighter and lighter. Those cold days of winter, when the sun hangs low in the sky, are indeed a challenge. To get enough light each day before we are plunged again into a long night. I really like that! It feels to me like a real primal, and essential, existential type struggle.

    This three-month period between the fall equinox and the winter solstice, when the earth is at its darkest (here in the Northern hemisphere) is my favorite time of the year. Most people I have spoken to on this matter think that’s a little weird!

    As far as names go, I wish I knew another name for the equinox besides “equinox,” which is too Latin-sounding for my taste. The Gaelic and other names favored in neo-paganism don’t work for me either. Guess I will have to invent my own name for this day. Something that evokes the coming darkness.

  • blackpagan

    Great post.

    I love the dark half of the year! Personally, it is more in sync with my natural sleep patterns. I’m always a little sad when the winter solstice comes and goes because I know it’s now starting to get lighter and lighter. Those cold days of winter, when the sun hangs low in the sky, are indeed a challenge. To get enough light each day before we are plunged again into a long night. I really like that! It feels to me like a real primal, and essential, existential type struggle.

    This three-month period between the fall equinox and the winter solstice, when the earth is at its darkest (here in the Northern hemisphere) is my favorite time of the year. Most people I have spoken to on this matter think that’s a little weird!

    As far as names go, I wish I knew another name for the equinox besides “equinox,” which is too Latin-sounding for my taste. The Gaelic and other names favored in neo-paganism don’t work for me either. Guess I will have to invent my own name for this day. Something that evokes the coming darkness.

  • http://beatherpes.com/how-long-do-cold-sores-take-to-show-up how long to cold sores take to

     Apply Castor Oil, it is proven to have properties that are anti-viral, and works well on herpes skin conditions. (In case you did not know, cold sores are a form of herpes, not the same strain as genital herpes, but a form, another common form is chicken pox.)
    Saint John’s Wort Oil- This essential oil works on the nervous system, so when it is applied to your skin it sinks right in and starts working away.

  • http://beatherpes.com/how-long-do-cold-sores-take-to-show-up how long to cold sores take to

     Apply Castor Oil, it is proven to have properties that are anti-viral, and works well on herpes skin conditions. (In case you did not know, cold sores are a form of herpes, not the same strain as genital herpes, but a form, another common form is chicken pox.)
    Saint John’s Wort Oil- This essential oil works on the nervous system, so when it is applied to your skin it sinks right in and starts working away.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X