The Last Word

I’m reading a book of short stories by Graham Greene called, The Last Word. Greene is a master of the short story, and this book doesn’t disappoint. The initial story, which serves as the title of the book, is about the execution of the last living Christian – Pope John XXIX. Greene describes this fascinating scenario (plot summary here, be warned it is a total spoiler), where religion has been abolished and the world now lives under one world government. The final blow to end Christianity is to kill the last remaining Christian. Or is it the final blow?
After reading this story, I’m reminded of a simple truth: the Kingdom of God advances by God’s own initiative. Humans are beckoned to respond and become involved and even to die in its pursuit, but we can never steal the initiative from God. Upon the death of the last living Christian – were that a reality – the seeds of faith would live on, even in the hearts and minds of the executioners. . . pretty stunning stuff. I wish Greene could have lived another 50 years. I share his characteristic lament of how little religion plays a role in public life. Yet, I have a feeling that religion is back in the game, to some extent.
Religion will play a larger role in Western Culture over the next fifty years than it has in the past fifty. The question is what kind of religion? Will it be a narrow, pedantic, algorithm, i.e., build the machine of Christian theology (modeled upon a dualistic scientific method of winners/losers; right/wrong; in/out), and crank out truth and salvation? Will it be the new, often shrill voice of nostalgic idealism? Or will it be a living, vibrant experience of the God who is unavoidable, i.e., an experience of freedom, oneness and the embrace of paradox and human finitude which always accompanies a true encounter with the divine? I think Greene envisions something more akin to the latter.

About Tim Suttle

Tim Suttle is a pastor, writer, and musician. He is the author of several books: Shrink: Faithful Ministry in a Church Growth Culture (Zondervan 2014), Public Jesus (The House Studio, 2012), and An Evangelical Social Gospel? (Cascade Books, 2011). Tim's work has been featured at The Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Sojourners, and other magazines and journals. Tim is also the founder and front-man of the popular Christian band Satellite Soul, with whom he toured for nearly a decade. He has planted three successful churches over the past 13 years and is the Senior Pastor of Redemption Church in Olathe, Kan. Tim's blog, Paperback Theology, is hosted at Patheos.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01158748331493342958 Scott Savage

    You nuance your articulation of the possible ways religion will play a role in society in the next fifty years in a way I have not heard from from you. Sounds like Sabbatical is treating you well!

    Also, we six episodes into the fourth season of The West Wing. This has been our summer evening leisure. Awesome! Katie and I both agree we'd vote for Bartlett (and Donna). Too bad they don't let cameras into the real White House.

    Peace,
    Scott

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/07471917839762088035 Keith Willson

    There is one Lord, one faith, and one baptism (Gal 3:27) which was once for all delivered to the saints (Jude 1:3). Truth will "win" in the end.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    Yes, as long as we remember truth is a person and not an abstract rational construct.


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